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Monthly News

SAH Chapter News January 2024

Below are the SAH regional chapter news updates received by the liaison during the month of January 2024.

NESAH – 1/16 Lecture Reminder (register today!)
LECTURE REMINDER!Don’t forget to register online (link below) and join us next Tuesday, 1/16, for our first event of 2024:“The Contract, the Contractor, and the Capitalization of American Building, 1870-1930”Chelsea Spencer2022 John Coolidge Fellowship RecipientTuesday, January 16, 2024
7:00pm
Presented via ZoomAttendance is free, but preregistration is required. Please register here.The 2022 John Coolidge Research Fellowship supported Chelsea’s archival fieldwork, sending her to Pittsburgh to study the construction records of the Frick Building, a twenty-story office building still standing in Downtown Pittsburgh. Managed by the George A. Fuller Company, construction of the Frick Building began in 1901 and was completed by 1903, leaving behind an unusually voluminous archive and an acrid dispute between the Fuller Company and its client, the wealthy industrialist Henry Clay Frick. Chelsea used this archive as a window onto the operations of what was then the largest, most well-capitalized construction company in the United States at a pivotal moment in the firm’s history. On January 16th she will give a virtual talk to share more about what she found in the archive and how it will contribute to her dissertation project.Chelsea Spencer is a PhD candidate in the History, Theory, and Criticism of Architecture and Art at MIT. Her dissertation traces the rise of general contracting in the United States.NESAH website

LAST CHANCE for Havana Modern This Sunday!



AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Gallo/Caballero on Havana ModernZoom PresentationSunday, January 28th, 1:00 PM PSTJoin authors and editor Ruben Gallo and MIguel Caballero as they explore the legacy of Modern architecture in Havana, Cuba. Read more…Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Purchase $5 ticket!.Read more Connect with u      
SAHSCC | Box 491952, Los Angeles, CA 90049

Dear NCCSAH members – I am writing to let you know that the City of San Francisco has embarked on a program of Upzoning and Height Increases (which they call Housing Choice). You can read it here: 

https://www.sfchronicle.com/sf/article/rezoning-backlash-lakeside-18621676.php

LINK TO INTERACTIVE MAP:

https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/6e0e399f9c82456dbda233eacebc433d/?data_id=dataSource_3-18c185e8fd3-layer-16%3A15636

SESAH Newsletter January 2024



SESAH Newsletter

January 2024

Please consider giving to our Annual Campaign

SESAH President’s Welcome

Dear Colleagues:

As I begin my first year as president, I write with gratitude for all that you do to make SESAH (pronounced seesaw) a welcoming, fun, and engaged professional society. Our members make SESAH a success. Whether you attend or present at the annual meeting, serve on a committee, task force, or the board, submit articles to ARRIS or updates to the newsletter, or just participate from afar and pay your dues, you are important to SESAH.

In 2022 we finalized our Strategic Plan (2022-2032); thanks to all who contributed to its development. We have already made progress in the four strategic areas of Membership, Education, Advocacy and Awareness, and Funding. I urge you to read the plan and see where you can help us move SESAH forward to achieve our mission of promoting the study, interpretation, and preservation of architecture and the built environment worldwide, with a focus on the American South. Over the next several months, I will highlight some of our accomplishments and ask for your help as we begin new initiatives.

Thanks also to everyone who made end-of-year contributions to our annual campaign. Your generosity supports our educational programs including student fellowships, conference registrations, and travel grants as well as our emerging professional conference grants. It is important to get our junior colleagues, students, and friends involved, and these financial incentives provide the necessary support and encouragement for the next generation to ensure that SESAH is relevant, dynamic, and welcoming. Your gifts are investments in the future of SESAH and our disciplines.

With great appreciation,

Leslie N. Sharp 

Save the Date: 2024 SESAH Conference! 

SESAH will hold its annual meeting and conference in Marietta, Georgia, October 2-5, 2024. Marietta is a vibrant, historic city about twenty miles north of downtown Atlanta. The sessions and other events will be hosted at the Department of Architecture at Kennesaw State University, Marietta Campus. Formerly the home of Southern Polytechnic State University that merged with KSU in 2015, the Marietta campus is a mid-to-late 20th century campus with award-winning architecture, including the 2002 Architecture Building designed by Heery International. 

The SESAH Board Meeting and dinner will be held on Wednesday, October 2. Paper sessions will begin Thursday morning and continue through Friday afternoon. Mark C. McDonald, former president and CEO of the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation and editor of The Architecture of the Last Colony: Georgia’s Historic Places, 1733-2000 (2023), will give the keynote address on Thursday evening. The study tour on Saturday, October 5 will include historic and architecturally significant places around the Atlanta area. There will be a SESAH block of rooms for $189.00/night at the nearby Marietta Hilton with regular shuttles to campus. More details to follow soon.

2025 Annual Campaign

SESAH has launched our 2024 Annual Campaign! Last year, we raised $3,200 to support students and young professionals.

For the 2024 Annual Campaign, we set a goal of raising $3,000. All donations—big and small—will enable us to assist students and young professionals by:

  • Waiving registration fees for students from across the U.S. to attend the 2024 conference in Marietta, Georgia. 
  • Awarding $2,000 for two students to travel to the 2024 conference. 
  • Awarding $1,000 for a young professional to travel to the 2024 conference. 
  • Awarding a $1,500 fellowship for graduate student research

As we look forward to the new year, we hope that you will contribute to help us continue to support students and young professionals. We are also offering the opportunity to make your donation in honor of friends, colleagues, and loved ones.

Remember that SESAH is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization so all contributions made by December 31, 2024, are tax deductible. If you need a receipt or more donation information, including a mailing address for sending a check, please contact the treasurer at treasurer@sesah.org  

Thank you for supporting SESAH!

Call for Editors of Arris, the Journal of SESAH

Deadline March 1, 2024

SESAH (Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians) seeks an Editor or Co-editors (2024-26) for two issues of its peer-reviewed journal, Arris (issues #36 and #37). Scholars and researchers are invited to respond to this call by March 1, 2024. Editorial positions are unpaid and would begin with work on volume 36 (2025) during the spring of 2024 under the current editors and end with the completion of volume 37 (2026). One of these issues may be based on a theme, chosen by the Editors and approved by the Arris Editorial Committee, that addresses particular theories, methodologies, or perspectives in the history and/or preservation of the built environment.

Founded in 1989, Arris publishes original scholarship on all aspects of the history and preservation of architecture, urbanism, and landscape. It has a particular interest in new perspectives on the American South; at the same time articles are not limited geographically or temporally. The journal consists of research articles, field notes, and book reviews. Since 2019, Arris has been published in partnership with the University of North Carolina Press (UNC Press).

Issues of Arris are typically produced by a single Editor or two Co-editors who are responsible for soliciting, reviewing, and editing manuscripts, and a Book Review Editor who selects books for review and reviewers. The Editors work in collaboration to establish the content for each issue, which goes to UNC Press for production and publication. Other matters that arise in creating the journal—e.g. administrative and financial—are addressed by the Arris Editorial Committee (which includes the Editors). Communication among the Editors, UNC Press, and the Committee occurs regularly in order to facilitate the process of creating the journal. The Editor (or, in the case of Co-editors, one of the Co-editors) sits on SESAH’s Board of Directors as an ex officio voting member.

Editors must maintain SESAH membership. They may reside outside its twelve-state territory. They may be academic or independent scholars, researchers, preservationists, or curators, and may be early in their professional careers as long as they have publication experience. Editors may not simultaneously hold an editorship position for another journal.

Applicants should send a CV, a Letter of Interest, and names of two references to Kathy Wheeler (kwheel24@utk.edu), chair of the Arris Editorial Committee, by March 1, 2024. The letter should state the position being applied for (Editor or Co-editors). It should include information on publication and/or editorial experience, a brief proposal for a themed issue (optional), and thoughts concerning future directions of Arris. Any questions may be directed to Prof. Wheeler. See the website for further information on Arris and SESAH.

San Gemini Preservation Studies 2024 Summer Field School accepting applications.

San Gemini Preservation Studies is a summer field school located in Central Italy that organizes lectures, research, fieldwork, workshops and field trips in the disciplines of historic preservation, restoration and conservation. They are now accepting applications for summer 2024.

These courses focus on the study of: historic buildings preservation, traditional forms of painting, conservation of archaeological ceramics, the restoration of books and paper in archival material. The various field projects include: documentation and restoration of medieval public buildings in San Gemini, the archaeological excavation in the ancient Roman city of Carsulae, as well as conservation work on the local historic archives. The SGPS program is a collaboration between scholars from various universities and local preservation groups, fostering a multidisciplinary approach to historic preservation. All academic activities are held in English.

An academic relationship has been established with West Virginia University that offers students the opportunity to apply for and receive credits through the WVU Art History Department. Applications are due March 15th. Find more information here.

Submit to Arris! 

Call for Papers: Articles and Field Notes

Arris, the journal of the Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians, is accepting submissions for articles and field notes to be published in upcoming issues.

Articles generally run from 5,000-7,000 words and are blind peer-reviewed. They should demonstrate a rigorous mastery over the scholarly literature, research methods, field work (if applicable), and available primary sources of the subject. Articles should proceed beyond a descriptive approach to draw new conclusions or present new theoretical paradigms.

Field notes are shorter contributions, approximately 2,500 words in length, and are blind peer-reviewed. These notes discuss significant ongoing field work or other research of interest to SESAH members.

Only original work neither published previously nor under review for publication elsewhere will be considered.

There is no specific deadline for submissions, which are accepted on a rolling basis. If an article or field notes is accepted, but the issue in progress already has a sufficient number of them, it will be published in the next issue.

Submissions should follow Arris guidelines.

Member News

Radical Roof Gardens panel call for abstracts

SESAH members Joseph Watson and Nathaniel Robert Walker are putting together a session for the 2024 Docomomo conference in Santiago, Chile. Their session “Radical Roof Gardens: Dream Spaces of Social Cohesion and Private Retreat” invites abstracts for research papers on modern roof gardens, with a particular focus on the twentieth century. See their panel proposal below:

Of Le Corbusier’s famous “Five Points” for the creation of a modern architecture, perhaps the most suggestive of utopian possibility was the roof garden terrace. Whether serving as the largest communal space of the Unité d’Habitation in Marseilles or providing expansive vistas over an urban park at the Casa Curutchet in La Plata, roof gardens asserted modernism’s technological exuberance and commitment to new perspectives and liberating reforms in cities and landscapes. Ironically, perhaps, roof gardens were also the least novel of Le Corbusier’s modern elements. They have a deep and well-known antiquity stretching back, to cite two examples, to the Hanging Gardens of Babylon and the palace walks of King David in Jerusalem—spaces of imperial power, luxury, and sensuality. Roof gardens became a fixture of utopian visions from the Renaissance onwards; Filarete included them in Sforzinda, while Frank Lloyd Wright imagined filling a landscape with villas topped by gardens for both leisure and the landing of private aircraft. Roof gardens even flourished in reality during the 1800s and early 1900s, particularly in great cities like New York and London, where they were often discussed as ideal fusions of the urban and the rural. In these years, rooftop terraces had a dualistic existence as hedonistic   pleasure grounds atop hotels, department stores, and theaters for the rich, while also serving as women-led refuges of charity for the poor on model tenements and public libraries. The international reputation of these roof gardens, now largely forgotten, is attested to in the English-language name of a magnificent cabaret and restaurant that crowned the Cerro San Cristóbal in Santiago de Chile in the 1930s: “Roof Garden.”

This session invites abstracts for research papers on modern roof gardens, with a particular focus on the twentieth century. We do not limit our call to examples in Latin America, but these are very welcome. Scholars such as Luis E. Carranza and Fernando Luiz Lara, in Modern Architecture in Latin America, and Valerie Fraser, in “Cannibalizing Le Corbusier,” have discussed roof gardens in these contexts, and we aim to build upon their work. What promises did rooftop terraces make as spaces of social elevation and/or private retreat and which have they kept or broken? How have they performed and endured in different climates, with varying degrees of maintenance, as the viability of different plant species (native and non-native), structural integrity, and the potential for leaks have been persistent problems for centuries? How did roof gardens carry forward older dreams and aspirations—including, potentially, Indigenous or Aboriginal traditions—into the Modern Movement? What new meanings and objectives did they acquire? What might have been lost? How did they strengthen and/or problematize modernism’s historically complex relationships with energy and ecology? How did the radical potential of roof gardens help to resist, reinforce, or propose alternatives to pre-existing social, economic, and racial divisions? What, ultimately, were the outcomes of Le Corbusier’s dream of roof gardens as radical spaces of utopian potential for the Modern Movement in architecture?

Does your institution subscribe to Arris?

If not, encourage them to subscribe in one of 3 ways:

  1. Print subscription for $50 annually (1 issue) through UNC Press’s subscription fulfillment partners at Duke University Press. Contact:
    1. Email subscriptions@dukeupress.edu 
    2. Phone toll-free in the US and Canada (888) 651-0122 
    3. Phone (919) 688-5134 
  2. Digital subscriptions for $50 to Arris’s full catalog are available through ProjectMUSE. Arris is on their Hosted platform, so they will need to get a single title subscription through ProjectMUSE. 
  3. For both print and digital subscriptions for $60/year, reach out to Duke University Press at the contact info above.
READ MORE ON OUR WEBSITE 

NESAH Annual Meeting Save-the-Date



Save the Date: Annual Meeting!Hi Amanda,Please mark your calendar for this year’s Annual Meeting of the New England Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians:Saturday, March 9, 2024We have some very exciting plans in the works and will be sharing more information soon via email and our website. Please stay tuned for further details! If you are not a current member but are interested in joining or renewing your membership with NESAH, please visit our Membership tab! You can also renew your chapter membership through SAH National.All the best,The NESAH Board
Free Symposium on Housing Red Vienna In-person in Silver Lake!
In-Person SymposiumHousing Vienna: Lessons For LASaturday, January 27th, 9:00 AM PSTThis event is free and open to the public, but space is limited.This event is hosted by the Neutra Institute for Survival Through Design and Friends of Residential Treasures (FORT:LA). It features speakers including John Ellis, AIA; Frances Anderton; and Anthony Fontenot…Read more! Reserve a space now!. Connect with u      SAHSCC | Box 491952, Los Angeles, CA 90049
Jan – March, Quarterly E-newsletter 2024 | Download the .pdf nowIn This IssueUnion Station TourHavana ModernWhen Eero Met His MatchBunshaftPeter J. Weber TourQuick LinksSAH/SCC Book ReviewsBrochures from Past EventsAbout UsBecome a MemberFull Printable Newsletter HerePresident’s LetterOur AdvertisersAD&D MuseumUnion Station: Behind the ScenesSAH/SCC On-Site Tour, DTLAFriday, January 19, 2024, 11 AM-1 PMSAH/SCC Life and Patron Members will join us for a very special, behind-the-scenes tour of Union Station from longtime SAH/SCC member George Meyer, Vice President/General Manager at Morlin Asset Management, the property and project management firm for the complex. Union Station (Parkinson and Parkinson, 1939) is nationally recognized as the last major train station built in the 20th century, is LA Historic-Cultural Monument #101, and has won numerous preservation awards. Read More…Photo: Courtesy of Tom BonnerGallo/Caballero on Havana ModernSAH/SCC Zoom ProgramSunday, January 28, 2024, 1-2:30 PM Pacific In the decades after World War II, from just prior to the revolution and into the mid-1980s, modernist architecture blossomed in Cuba, attracting both native talent and leading international architects. Havana Modern: Critical Readings in Cuban Architecture (Arquine, 2023) examines Cuban modernism’s highlights with a wealth of archival materials, photos, and new scholarship. Read More… Authors on Architecture: Hagberg on Aline & EeroSAH/SCC Zoom ProgramSunday, February 11, 2024, 1-2:30 PM PacificCelebrate an architectural love story for the ages when Eva Hagberg discusses her book When Eero Met His Match: Aline Louchheim Saarinen and the Making of an Architect (Princeton University Press, 2022). Read More…Photo: Courtesy of Eva Hagberg. Authors on Architecture: Adams on BunshaftSAH/SCC Zoom ProgramSunday, March 17, 2024, 1-2:30 PM PacificJoin author Nicholas Adams as he shares his book Gordon Bunshaft and SOM: Building Corporate Modernism (Yale University Press, 2019). Adams explores the contested line between Bunshaft’s ambition for acclaim as a singular artistic genius and the collaborative structure of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill’s (SOM) architectural partnership. Read More…Photo: Bunshaft Book coverPeter J. Weber: Architect & CraftsmanSAH/SCC On-Site Tour, RiversideSaturday, March 3, 2024, 10 AM-1 PM SAH/SCC goes to the Inland Empire to learn about the life and work of Peter J. Weber (1893-1983). We’ll get a special tour of the architect’s work on the Mission Inn (Arthur B. Benton, 1903 and 1910; Myron Hunt and Elmer Grey, 1914; G. Stanley Wilson, 1932) in Riverside as well as a tour of the home Weber built for himself (1932-1938). Read More…Photo: Courtesy of Davestolt    
SAHSCC | P.O. Box 491952, Los Angeles, CA 90049

Categories
Monthly News

SAH Chapter News Nov-Dec 2023

Below are the SAH regional chapter news updates received by the liaison during the months of November and December 2023.

Subject: This Sunday! Geva on Modern Synagogues, 1950s-1960s
AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Geva on Modern Synagogues, 1950s-1960sZoom PresentationSunday, November 12th, 1:00 PM PSTJoin author/editor Anat Geva as she explores the architecture of Modern synagogues across America. Learn how these expressive Modern buildings served the communities in which they were built. Read more…Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!

Subject: SESAH Dec. 2023 Newsletter



SESAH Newsletter

December 2023

Please consider giving to our Annual Campaign

Save the Date: 2024 SESAH Conference! 

SESAH will hold its annual meeting and conference in Marietta, Georgia, October 2-5, 2024. Marietta is a vibrant, historic city about twenty miles north of downtown Atlanta. The sessions and other events will be hosted at the Department of Architecture at Kennesaw State University, Marietta Campus. Formerly the home of Southern Polytechnic State University that merged with KSU in 2015, the Marietta campus is a mid-to-late 20th century campus with award-winning architecture, including the 2002 Architecture Building designed by Heery International. 

The SESAH Board Meeting and dinner will be held on Wednesday, October 2. Paper sessions will begin Thursday morning and continue through Friday afternoon. Mark C. McDonald, former president and CEO of the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation and editor of The Architecture of the Last Colony: Georgia’s Historic Places, 1733-2000 (2023), will give the keynote address on Thursday evening. The study tour on Saturday, October 5 will include historic and architecturally significant places around the Atlanta area. There will be a SESAH block of rooms for $189.00/night at the nearby Marietta Hilton with regular shuttles to campus. More details to follow soon.

2023 Annual Campaign

Last year’s annual campaign exceeded all expectations. We raised over $5,800 with donations from members living across the country. For the 2023 annual campaign, we set a modest goal of raising $3,000. So far, we have received $1,750 so we need another $1,250 to reach our goal. All donations—big and small—enabled us to assist students and young professionals by:

  • Waiving registration fees for 12 students from across the U.S. to attend the 2023 conference in Little Rock. 
  • Awarding $2,000 for a student from UVA and a student from South Dakota State University to travel to the 2023 conference. 
  • Awarding a $1,500 fellowship for graduate student research at the University of Georgia

As we look forward to the new year, we hope that you will contribute to help us build upon these successes. With your gift, we will be able to offer waived registration fees for students at the 2024 conference in Marietta, Georgia, and provide travel grants and research fellowships for students and young professionals. We are also offering the opportunity to make donations in honor of friends, colleagues, and loved ones. Click HERE to donate or for instructions on donating by mail. SESAH is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization so all contributions made by December 31, 2023, are tax deductible. If you need a receipt or more donation information, please contact the treasurer at treasurer@sesah.org 

Thank you for supporting SESAH!

Call for Editors of Arris, the Journal of SESAH

Deadline March 1, 2024

SESAH (Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians) seeks an Editor or Co-editors (2024-26) for two issues of its peer-reviewed journal, Arris (issues #36 and #37). Scholars and researchers are invited to respond to this call by March 1, 2024. Editorial positions are unpaid and would begin with work on volume 36 (2025) during the spring of 2024 under the current editors and end with the completion of volume 37 (2026). One of these issues may be based on a theme, chosen by the Editors and approved by the Arris Editorial Committee, that addresses particular theories, methodologies, or perspectives in the history and/or preservation of the built environment.

Founded in 1989, Arris publishes original scholarship on all aspects of the history and preservation of architecture, urbanism, and landscape. It has a particular interest in new perspectives on the American South; at the same time articles are not limited geographically or temporally. The journal consists of research articles, field notes, and book reviews. Since 2019, Arris has been published in partnership with the University of North Carolina Press (UNC Press).

Issues of Arris are typically produced by a single Editor or two Co-editors who are responsible for soliciting, reviewing, and editing manuscripts, and a Book Review Editor who selects books for review and reviewers. The Editors work in collaboration to establish the content for each issue, which goes to UNC Press for production and publication. Other matters that arise in creating the journal—e.g. administrative and financial—are addressed by the Arris Editorial Committee (which includes the Editors). Communication among the Editors, UNC Press, and the Committee occurs regularly in order to facilitate the process of creating the journal. The Editor (or, in the case of Co-editors, one of the Co-editors) sits on SESAH’s Board of Directors as an ex officio voting member.

Editors must maintain SESAH membership. They may reside outside its twelve-state territory. They may be academic or independent scholars, researchers, preservationists, or curators, and may be early in their professional careers as long as they have publication experience. Editors may not simultaneously hold an editorship position for another journal.

Applicants should send a CV, a Letter of Interest, and names of two references to Kathy Wheeler (kwheel24@utk.edu), chair of the Arris Editorial Committee, by March 1, 2024. The letter should state the position being applied for (Editor or Co-editors). It should include information on publication and/or editorial experience, a brief proposal for a themed issue (optional), and thoughts concerning future directions of Arris. Any questions may be directed to Prof. Wheeler. See the website for further information on Arris and SESAH.

San Gemini Preservation Studies 2024 Summer Field School accepting applications.

San Gemini Preservation Studies is a summer field school located in Central Italy that organizes lectures, research, fieldwork, workshops and field trips in the disciplines of historic preservation, restoration and conservation. They are now accepting applications for summer 2024.

These courses focus on the study of: historic buildings preservation, traditional forms of painting, conservation of archaeological ceramics, the restoration of books and paper in archival material. The various field projects include: documentation and restoration of medieval public buildings in San Gemini, the archaeological excavation in the ancient Roman city of Carsulae, as well as conservation work on the local historic archives. The SGPS program is a collaboration between scholars from various universities and local preservation groups, fostering a multidisciplinary approach to historic preservation. All academic activities are held in English.

An academic relationship has been established with West Virginia University that offers students the opportunity to apply for and receive credits through the WVU Art History Department. Applications are due March 15th. Find more information here.

Submit to Arris! 

Call for Papers: Articles and Field Notes

Arris, the journal of the Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians, is accepting submissions for articles and field notes to be published in upcoming issues.

Articles generally run from 5,000-7,000 words and are blind peer-reviewed. They should demonstrate a rigorous mastery over the scholarly literature, research methods, field work (if applicable), and available primary sources of the subject. Articles should proceed beyond a descriptive approach to draw new conclusions or present new theoretical paradigms.

Field notes are shorter contributions, approximately 2,500 words in length, and are blind peer-reviewed. These notes discuss significant ongoing field work or other research of interest to SESAH members.

Only original work neither published previously nor under review for publication elsewhere will be considered.

There is no specific deadline for submissions, which are accepted on a rolling basis. If an article or field notes is accepted, but the issue in progress already has a sufficient number of them, it will be published in the next issue.

Submissions should follow Arris guidelines.

Member News

Danielle Willkens Featured in Architectural Digest Article on Historic Site Tourism

Danielle Willkens was featured in an Architectural Digest article looking at the effects of tourism on historic sites. Wilkins referenced her time as the 2015 H. Allen Brooks Traveling Fellow which she spent traveling the world to visit heritage sites. Read more here.

Does your institution subscribe to Arris???

If not, encourage them to subscribe in one of 3 ways:

  1. Print subscription for $50 annually (1 issue) through UNC Press’s subscription fulfillment partners at Duke University Press. Contact:
    1. Email subscriptions@dukeupress.edu 
    2. Phone toll-free in the US and Canada (888) 651-0122 
    3. Phone (919) 688-5134 
  2. Digital subscriptions for $50 to Arris’s full catalog are available through ProjectMUSE. Arris is on their Hosted platform, so they will need to get a single title subscription through ProjectMUSE. 
  3. For both print and digital subscriptions for $60/year, reach out to Duke University Press at the contact info above.
READ MORE ON OUR WEBSITE 
Enjoy recordings of our best Zoom programs for just $5 each!Forgot to sign up for a program during 2023? Now you can purchase a link to the recorded program for just $5. From the “cottages’ of Newport to the buildings inspired by the automobile, SAH/SCC has a program for you. Browse our list of programs from 2023 or go back in time as see programs you may have missed. Watch at your leisure and we won’t tell anyone if you pour yourself a glass of holiday cheer!.See the full list…Purchase a program now!. Connect with u      
SAHSCC 
LECTURE REMINDER!Don’t forget to register online (link below) and join us next Tuesday, 1/16, for our first event of 2024:“The Contract, the Contractor, and the Capitalization of American Building, 1870-1930”Chelsea Spencer2022 John Coolidge Fellowship RecipientTuesday, January 16, 2024
7:00pm
Presented via ZoomAttendance is free, but preregistration is required. Please register here.The 2022 John Coolidge Research Fellowship supported Chelsea’s archival fieldwork, sending her to Pittsburgh to study the construction records of the Frick Building, a twenty-story office building still standing in Downtown Pittsburgh. Managed by the George A. Fuller Company, construction of the Frick Building began in 1901 and was completed by 1903, leaving behind an unusually voluminous archive and an acrid dispute between the Fuller Company and its client, the wealthy industrialist Henry Clay Frick. Chelsea used this archive as a window onto the operations of what was then the largest, most well-capitalized construction company in the United States at a pivotal moment in the firm’s history. On January 16th she will give a virtual talk to share more about what she found in the archive and how it will contribute to her dissertation project.Chelsea Spencer is a PhD candidate in the History, Theory, and Criticism of Architecture and Art at MIT. Her dissertation traces the rise of general contracting in the United States.NESAH website



In-Person SymposiumHousing Vienna: Lessons For LASaturday, January 27th, 9:00 AM PSTThis event is free and open to the public, but space is limited.This event is hosted by the Neutra Institute for Survival Through Design and Friends of Residential Treasures (FORT:LA). It features speakers including John Ellis, AIA; Frances Anderton; and Anthony Fontenot…Read more! Reserve a space now!
Jan – March, Quarterly E-newsletter 2024 | Download the .pdf nowIn This IssueUnion Station TourHavana ModernWhen Eero Met His MatchBunshaftPeter J. Weber TourQuick LinksSAH/SCC Book ReviewsBrochures from Past EventsAbout UsBecome a MemberFull Printable Newsletter HerePresident’s LetterOur AdvertisersAD&D MuseumUnion Station: Behind the ScenesSAH/SCC On-Site Tour, DTLAFriday, January 19, 2024, 11 AM-1 PMSAH/SCC Life and Patron Members will join us for a very special, behind-the-scenes tour of Union Station from longtime SAH/SCC member George Meyer, Vice President/General Manager at Morlin Asset Management, the property and project management firm for the complex. Union Station (Parkinson and Parkinson, 1939) is nationally recognized as the last major train station built in the 20th century, is LA Historic-Cultural Monument #101, and has won numerous preservation awards. Read More…Photo: Courtesy of Tom BonnerGallo/Caballero on Havana ModernSAH/SCC Zoom ProgramSunday, January 28, 2024, 1-2:30 PM Pacific In the decades after World War II, from just prior to the revolution and into the mid-1980s, modernist architecture blossomed in Cuba, attracting both native talent and leading international architects. Havana Modern: Critical Readings in Cuban Architecture (Arquine, 2023) examines Cuban modernism’s highlights with a wealth of archival materials, photos, and new scholarship. Read More…Authors on Architecture: Hagberg on Aline & EeroSAH/SCC Zoom ProgramSunday, February 11, 2024, 1-2:30 PM PacificCelebrate an architectural love story for the ages when Eva Hagberg discusses her book When Eero Met His Match: Aline Louchheim Saarinen and the Making of an Architect (Princeton University Press, 2022). Read More…Photo: Courtesy of Eva Hagberg. Authors on Architecture: Adams on BunshaftSAH/SCC Zoom ProgramSunday, March 17, 2024, 1-2:30 PM PacificJoin author Nicholas Adams as he shares his book Gordon Bunshaft and SOM: Building Corporate Modernism (Yale University Press, 2019). Adams explores the contested line between Bunshaft’s ambition for acclaim as a singular artistic genius and the collaborative structure of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill’s (SOM) architectural partnership. Read More…Photo: Bunshaft Book coverPeter J. Weber: Architect & CraftsmanSAH/SCC On-Site Tour, RiversideSaturday, March 3, 2024, 10 AM-1 PM SAH/SCC goes to the Inland Empire to learn about the life and work of Peter J. Weber (1893-1983). We’ll get a special tour of the architect’s work on the Mission Inn (Arthur B. Benton, 1903 and 1910; Myron Hunt and Elmer Grey, 1914; G. Stanley Wilson, 1932) in Riverside as well as a tour of the home Weber built for himself (1932-1938). Read More…Photo: Courtesy of Davestolt    

Dear NCCSAH members,

I am writing today to encourage you to look at the City of San Francisco’s implementation plan for its Housing Element in the form of Zoning Amendments. Here is a link to the map showing upzoning and increased heights across the city. It is worth studying closely and looking for proposed changes in your neighborhood. 

https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/6e0e399f9c82456dbda233eacebc433d/?data_id=dataSource_3-18c185e8fd3-layer-16%3A15636

Here is a link to a survey you can take about housing choice in San Francisco:

Please fill out this online survey by FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22nd linked here in multiple languages: Fall 2023 Survey here! 



LECTURE: “The Contract, the Contractor, and the Capitalization of American Building, 1870-1930”Chelsea Spencer2022 John Coolidge Fellowship RecipientTuesday, January 16, 2024
7:00pm
Presented via ZoomAttendance is free, but preregistration is required. Please register here.The 2022 John Coolidge Research Fellowship supported Chelsea’s archival fieldwork, sending her to Pittsburgh to study the construction records of the Frick Building, a twenty-story office building still standing in Downtown Pittsburgh. Managed by the George A. Fuller Company, construction of the Frick Building began in 1901 and was completed by 1903, leaving behind an unusually voluminous archive and an acrid dispute between the Fuller Company and its client, the wealthy industrialist Henry Clay Frick. Chelsea used this archive as a window onto the operations of what was then the largest, most well-capitalized construction company in the United States at a pivotal moment in the firm’s history. On January 16th she will give a virtual talk to share more about what she found in the archive and how it will contribute to her dissertation project.Chelsea Spencer is a PhD candidate in the History, Theory, and Criticism of Architecture and Art at MIT. Her dissertation traces the rise of general contracting in the United States.2024 NESAH Fellowships – APPLICATIONS OPEN!The New England Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians invites applications for the Robert Rettig Student Annual Meeting Fellowship and the John Coolidge Research FellowshipApplications are due by February 1, 2024, at 11:59pmThe Rettig Fellowship provides financial assistance for graduate students and emerging professionals attending the Annual International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH). The fellowship include support of up to $500, plus a registration fee waiver. This year’s annual meeting will be held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 17–21, 2024.The John Coolidge Research Fellowship assists graduate students at a New England college or university working on topics in architectural history, the built environment, or a related field through an award of $1,000 to support their research. More information about the fellowships, and application details, can be found on our website.2024 Call for New Board MembersDo you have ideas for tours, speakers, and advocacy for the New England chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians (NESAH)? Do you want to help shape the future direction of the organization? NESAH is looking for new members for its board, and hereby issues a call for nominations and self-nominations. Potential board members should be engaged in scholarship, practice, or preservation related to the built environment, and should be motivated, dynamic, and looking to contribute to the future of our regional chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians.NESAH is a coalition of practitioners, scholars, and enthusiasts from across New England that promotes the study, interpretation, and conservation of architecture, design, landscapes, and cultural heritage for the benefit of all. Our goal is a deeper understanding and appreciation of our architectural heritage. For more information about our organization, please visit our website.To express your interest, or to nominate someone else, please send an email outlining the qualifications of the nominee to nesah.president@gmail.com by January 15, 2024.Calling Architectural Historians of Dedham, MA!image: 1908 postcard picturing downtown Dedham, MAThe Dedham Public Library is seeking presenters on the architectural history of Dedham, MA. If you have expertise in the architecture of this historic Massachusetts town, please contact Michaela Calderwood, Adult Services Librarian at Dedham Public Library: mcalderwood@minlib.netNESAH website
In-Person Booksigning in Silver LakeUCSB Exhibit: Helena ArahueteSaturday, December 9th, 3:00 PM PSTJoin us on Saturday, December 9th at the Neutra Office Building in Silver Lake to celebrate the release of the exhibition catalog: From Within: The Architecture of Helena Arahuete (ArtEZ, 20203). Architect Helena Arahuete will be joined by architectural historians and contributors to the catalog, Mimi Zeiger and Alan Hess, in discussion moderated by curator Silvia Perera on the present and future of organic architecture.This event is free to the public!Reserve a space now and include “Helena Arahuete Event” in the subject line!
LANDSCAPE HISTORY CHAPTERof the Society of Architectural Historians
November 2023The Blackfeet Nation releases a herd of bison into the wild in 2023, the first time bison have freely roamed the landscape in 150 years. Hunter D’Antuono | Flathead Beacon

Dear colleagues:
A busy time of year so right to the point: Please send announcements, inquiries, and any other materials you want included in our newsletter to  wayt01@do aks.org.   

Check out https://www.sahlandscape.org/. It would be helpful to expand our list of resources. If you are interested in helping us inventory resources, let me know. 

Best, Thaisa et al…
Director | Garden & Landscape Studies | Dumbarton Oaks | Trustees for Harvard University
 _________________________________
 OF NOTE…._____________________________________
 Jefferson and Native Americans  
In observance of National Native American History Month, we invite you to explore our resources on Native American history at Monticello and Thomas Jefferson’s complex legacy regarding Indigenous peoples. Learn more about Jefferson’s varied views on Native Americans, the dynamics between colonists and Indigenous tribes, and the lasting impact of this history on our world today.      CLICK TO CONNECT       ______________________________________

2024 John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize and David R. Coffin Publication Grant
The University of Virginia Center for Cultural Landscapes invites you to submit publications for this year’s 2024 John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize and David R. Coffin Publication Grant. We welcome nominations for the John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize and the David R. Coffin Publication Grant from both publishers and authors.  The John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize will be awarded to a book published in the last three years (2021, 2022, 2023) that has made a significant contribution to the study and understanding of garden history and landscape design. The prize winner will be invited to give a book talk at the University of Virginia and presented with a monetary award. The application deadline for the John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize is May 1, 2024. Note, the change in this deadline from previous years is to better align with the academic calendar and availability of the jury.  The David R. Coffin Publication Grant supports the production of a future publication of a manuscript under contract in the field of landscape studies. The application deadline for the David R. Coffin Publication Grant is January 1, 2024.  Detailed descriptions of the eligibility requirements, application procedures, and past winners for each award can be found on the Center for Cultural Landscapes website. Note that a single winner will be chosen for each prize in 2024, a change from past years.  
Please submit all inquiries to Lsibookprize@virginia.edu with the subject heading: 2024 Book Prize Nomination

_____________________________________________CALL FOR PAPERS_____________________________________________4th International Conference of the Association of Architecture and Urban Planning Historians (AhAU – Spain), We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers of the 4th International Conference of the Association of Architecture and Urban Planning Historians (AhAU – Spain) with the title “City and Nature. Approaches from an environmental-history angle”, that will take place on October 24th and 25th 2024 at the Real Colegio María Cristina, San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Madrid.Deadline for abstract submission: 20 November 2023Please visit https://ahau.es/congreso/iv-congreso-internacional-de-la-ahau-otono-2024/ for the call, guidelines for authors and a brief explanation of the review and selection process for abstracts and full papers (papers are accepted in both Spanish and English).

_____________________________________________Landscape Journal
Landscape Journal welcomes submissions of original manuscripts that advance our understanding of land planning, design, policy, and management practices as well as their consequences. Manuscripts examining land planning, design, policy, and management outcomes over a range of geographic contexts and spatiotemporal scales are especially welcome. Contributions are invited from any disciplinary perspective.
 
Article Types
Landscape Journal strives to publish a diverse mix of articles and critical reviews.
 
1. Original Research (5,000–8,000 words)
Quantitative and qualitative empirical research, including historical analyses and rigorous comparative analyses of multiple case studies. 
 
2. Systematic Literature Reviews (5,000–10,000 words)
Syntheses of landscape theory and state-of-the-art design teaching, research, and professional practice. Systematic reviews identify knowledge gaps and inform research agendas.
 
3. Perspective Essays (2,000–5,000 words)
Perspectives from Practice essays reflect on contemporary practice advances, challenges, or opportunities—and comment on implications for teaching, research, and design practice.
 
4. Policy Briefs (3,000–6,000 words)
Evidence-based analyses of current policies and policy alternatives—whether enacted by governments, professions, or other institutions.
 
5. Critical Reviews (500–2,500 words)
Critical reviews of books, films, videos, conferences, websites, and software are welcome. Most book reviews are written within one year after the book’s publication date.
 
Authors who are interested in writing a critical review or perspective essay should first contact the editorial office. Proposals for special issues are also welcome.
 ___________________________________ Journal of the studies in History and Theory of Architecture The journal of studies in History and Theory of Architecture https://sita.uauim.ro/ ), published by the Department of Architectural History & Theory and Heritage Conservation at “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urbanism in Bucharest, Romania, invites submissions for the 2024 issue

Landscape as Horizon

In the last chapter of L’architecture au futur depuis 1889, Jean-Louis Cohen listed several “vanishing points” that, although barely visible in the distance, would allow architecture to escape the unrelenting aspiration for originality, newness, monumentality, ornament, in the end only engendering desolate, generic, ultimately boring spaces, devoid of life. The topics mentioned by Cohen indicate instances that allow the architectural profession to aspire to a type of social, political, or indeed cultural relevance in the contemporary world. Their singularity resides in that they are often examples led by practice, yet to be absorbed in the more theoretical strata of architecture.
Among the different such vanishing points the one entitled Landscape as horizon seems to be one of the most challenging, all the while holding the promise to branch out into many critical contemporary topics.

For the next issue of sITA, we invite contributions that look into general or detailed topics concerning:
    * landscape as subversion, alternative or complement to mainstream urbanism;
    * questioning the traditional limits between the rural and the urban, between countryside and the city, between the natural and the manmade;
    * landscape as unlimited territory for new approaches, habits, social responsibilities, and openings to new cultural horizons;
    * historical and/or emergent approaches in theory and practice related to landscape;
    * new topics and paradigms in practice: agro-culture, post-Covid behaviors, urban acupuncture …
    * planning non-intervention to preserve landscape with its non-artificial, self-regulating and constantly changing components, incompatible with the fundamentally human endeavor of making things last longer.Preliminary abstracts of 200 – 250 words are to be submitted online https://sita.uauim.ro/call-for-papers, no later than December 8, 2023.
Contact Information: The journal of sITA (studies in History and Theory of Architecture) ( https://sita.uauim.ro/) is published by the Department of Architectural History & Theory and Heritage Conservation at “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urbanism in Bucharest. sITA (studies in History and Theory of Architecture) is a peer-reviewed open access journal, with both online and print versions, indexed in Arts & Humanities Citation Index (Web of Science), Scopus,EBSCOhost, Index Copernicus, CEEOL, ERIH PLUS, DOAJ, ProQuest/Ulrichsweb, Scipio, Google Scholar, and WorldCat. 
____________________________________________
 Plants and Animals
Editors: Susan McHughPatrícia VieiraPlants and Animals: Interdisciplinary Approaches aims to publish scholarly work that addresses common challenges across the fields of plant and animal studies from interdisciplinary perspectives. The series welcomes monographs and edited collections that focus and reflect upon interactions of plants, animals, and humans in innovative ways. At a time of large-scale anthropogenic species extinction, there is a pressing need to promote scholarship that can help us envision more equitable and harmonious forms of coexistence on the planet. The series therefore encourages submissions explicitly geared to build bridges not only between plant and animal studies, but also leading-edge research on other forms of life or ways of being, including fungi, lichens, algae and other microorganisms, as well as scholarship on fantasy creatures, cryptids, semi-living beings, and even non-living forms of existence. The goal is to abolish an artificially compartmentalized view of the world in order to add to the ways of knowing that are beginning to grow through the interconnections between these related fields of study. Grounded in the humanities, Plants and Animals welcomes trans-disciplinary perspectives that engage with scholarship in the social sciences and in the natural sciences.____________________________________________Feeding the citizens? Urban land and landownership in past and presentSTAM Ghent, Ghent, Belgium, 11-12 April 2024Call for Papers (deadline: December 1st 2023)Crossing present-day debates on land-based food supplies with different configurations of urban land and landownership in the past, this conference welcomes contributions from different geographic regions and different time periods, and how such experiences might find inspiration in the past.Not so long ago, agricultural land was by far the most important of capital. Given the importance of agricultural land as capital it is no wonder that urban based institutions and families accumulated more and more agricultural land as time progressed. In highly urbanized regions like the Low Countries or Italy, urban monasteries, churches, and charitable institutions easily controlled 20 to 30 percent of the land in the wide surroundings of the city, and this share was matched by private owners.At a moment when both the financialization of urban real estate and the market-dependency of urban food supplies are hotly debated, this conference aims to question the alternative and complementary functions of urban land and landownership:How important was urban ownership of (farm-)land? Who owned farmland? Only institutions and the upper class? Or also middling groups or commoners?Did farmland generate direct flows of food ‘from farm to fork’, either on a structural base or in times of food crises (food security)?How important were these land-based food supplies for the food-provisioning of cities?Which other functions did urban farmland have (ex. As leisure and holiday estate, for social prestige, as capital buffer in times of crisis etc.)?What was the impact of urban land and landownership for the rural economy? Did urban capital spur agricultural innovations or scale enlargement? Did urban landownership act as insurance mechanism (ex. rebuilding farms after calamities)?Did urban landownership help to strengthen the bounds between farmers and the city? How did these bounds materialize? By providing easier access to the city?We accept scholars at all career stages, including early career. Papers will be selected by an international committee, and with the aim of ensuring a broad spread of topics for the conference.Submissions should include:Title and abstractA short bioSend all submissions by email to: cecile.bruyet@uantwerpen.beDeadline for Submissions: 1 December 2023. The conference will take place at the city museum STAM in Ghent, Belgium, on 11-12 April 2024. This conference is the result of a collaboration between the University of Antwerp, the University of Ghent, STAM Ghent and the KULeuven Interfaculty Centre for Agrarian History.

____________________________________________Online Journal Arcadia: Exploration in Environmental HistoryArcadia (ISSN 2199-3408) is now inviting new submissions. Arcadia: Explorations in Environmental History is an open-access, peer-reviewed publication platform for short, illustrated, and engaging environmental histories. Embedded in a particular time and place, each story focuses on a site, event, person, organization, or species as it relates to nature and human society. By publishing digitally on the Environment & Society Portal, Arcadia promotes accessibility and visibility of original research in global environmental history and cognate disciplines. Each peer-reviewed article includes a profile of the researcher, links, and suggested readings.Contributors are free to choose their own environmentally themed topics, but for this volume we especially welcome submissions on historical events in Southeast Asia, North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Central Asia, and other areas currently underrepresented on this map.Contact Information: To submit, simply send a filled-out version of the sumission form, which you can find on our website here, together with your draft submission to Arcadia’s managing editor, Pauline Kargruber (arcadia@carsoncenter.lmu.de)—guidelines are included in the form. Your email should also include 2–5 images and/or multimedia (with permissions if necessary) and a profile photo.
https://www.environmentandsociety.org/arcadia/contribution   ___________________________________
 GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
____________________________________  Dumbarton Oaks “Democracy and Landscape” FELLOWSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
 Dumbarton Oaks, a research institute of Harvard University located in Washington DC  announces a post-doctoral fellowship position in Democracy and Landscape. This is intended for an early career postdoctoral fellow in environmental history with a research focus on race, indigeneity, and/or settler colonialism as revealed in place and on land. 
 
Details regarding the position are available on our website: https://www.doaks.org/about/employment/post-doctoral-fellow-in-democracy-and-landscape-mellon-initiative. Review of applications will begin on December 15, 2023. 

___________________________________ Editor-in Chief and Editorial Assistant of Architectural Histories
Architectural Histories, the international, blind peer-reviewed, open access scholarly journal of the European Architectural History Network (EAHN) is now seeking to appoint a new Editor-in-Chief and Editorial Assistant to start on 1 January 2025, each for a four-year term. The new appointees will start working with the current team from 1 September 2024 and gradually take over their duties.

The positions of Editor-in-Chief and Editorial Assistant are not remunerated and expenses are not covered. The Editor-in-Chief’s average workload is one day per week, and the Editorial Assistant’s is 4 to 8 hours per week; both are subject to fluctuation.Application
Applications should consist of a CV (max. 3 pages) and a cover letter (max. 2 pages) specifying the candidate’s motivation, skills and qualities. Applications should be emailed to the Editorial Search Committee by 31 January 2024, by care of secretary@eahn.orgMore information; https://eahn.org/2023/10/call-for-applications-for-editor-in-chief-and-editorial-assistant-of-architectural-histories/
___________________________________  NEH Landmarks Program Applications to direct a NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture program in 2025 are now open. We hope the following snapshot of the Landmarks program and its focus, along with tips and resources, are helpful as you think about creating your own program. WHAT DOES THE LANDMARKS PROGRAM DO? Landmarks of American History and Culture programs for K-12 educatorsand higher education and humanities professionals situate the study of topics and themes in the humanities within sites, areas, or regions of historic and cultural significance to expand participants’ knowledge of and approaches to teaching diverse histories, cultures, and perspectives in the United States and its jurisdictions.  LANDMARKS PROGRAMS:Engage in humanistic inquiry, experiential learning, lectures, archival work, and meetings with community membersInclude place-based learning activities, such as visits to museums, libraries, historic homes, national parks, cemeteries, archives, and a range of other sitesConsider how monuments, markers, and memorials represent events, eras, individuals, and/or groupsExamine the importance of memory, unmarked sites of cultural and historical significance, and how places change over time  ____________________________________   The National Park Service (NPS) Mellon Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship Program: Examining the Intersections of Indigenous Collections, Context, and Contemporary Art Postdoctoral Fellow – Cambridge, MA –
ACE is sponsoring a Mellon Fellowship at Longfellow National Historic Site in Cambridge, MA. Application deadline for this post-doc is December 1, 2023.
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://usaconservationmellonfellowships.applicantpool.com/jobs/1034354__;!!K-Hz7m0Vt54!nvROKJ6Jg48HQHMs_bBi-__HuK8xcczF2M2jeRTo__87VY70oPhPcLBe4lOF8PGBIqOCjOKc3j4DiZCTsw$

NPS places recent humanities PhDs with NPS sites and programs across the agency. In collaboration with NPS staff and partners, the incoming cohort of Mellon Humanities Fellows will complete original research projects, and develop new interpretive and educational programming, helping the agency connect more people to places that matter by incorporating new sources and perspectives into its storytelling.The Mellon Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship Program is a signature element of the National Park Service’s commemoration of the 250th Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, during which the Park Service will join with other agencies and all Americans to celebrate and contemplate the meaning of the Declaration of Independence and its relevance to our lives today. As the steward of our nation’s parks, heritage sites, and special places, NPS is committed to learning from the complex and challenging histories contained within them, building toward a future of freedom and possibility for all Americans.This opportunity is generously supported by a generous grant from the Mellon Foundation through the National Park Foundation (NPF). The project is administered via a three-way agreement among NPS, National Park Foundation (NPF), and American Conservation Experience (ACE).
___________________________________________
 2024 Practice Grant
The Practice Grant opens access and expands approaches to landscape design through its direct funding to individuals and groups committed to applied land-based practice. Past award winners are an excellent reference for the type of work they support, which ranges from design, ecology, gardening, farming, restoration, and conservation. All this information along with the application can be found on the Practice Foundation website
 
The application is simple and straight forward and is open now until December 1, 2023.

Additionally, the team at Practice Foundation is always happy to answer any questions. You can find them at grant@practicelandscape.com 

  ____________________________________________

CONFERENCES 
_____________________________________________
 Writing Land into Architectural HistoriesDates: 22 – 22 Mar, 2024Location: Ithaca, New York, United StatesAddress: 921 University AveContact: Qianye YuEmail: qy238@cornell.eduWebsite: https://aap.cornell.edu/news-events/symposium/writing-land-architectural-histories#open-sec-0The spring 2024 symposium “Writing Land into Architectural Histories,” organized by the doctoral students in Cornell University’s History of Architecture and Urbanism Society (HAUS), aims to explore the entangled histories of the built environment, land, and ecologies, examining intertwined methodologies that address questions of writing land into and out of histories of architecture.The combinatory practices of both architectural and landscape architectural history have grappled with new ways to interrogate the instrumentality of land as a mechanism that perpetuates relationships of power. How do land policies integrate into the built environment to produce various forms of skill and expertise that challenge normative, often colonial and imperial, forms of knowledge production? How does the materiality of land shape architecture? How do technologies of land and state-making processes move bodies across land? How do various forms of colonialism imbue structural histories of violence on and to land?Spanning a broad temporal range and extending to various geographies, we invite doctoral students working on the built environment in any discipline to rethink ways of utilizing land as a method in transnational and transimperial histories of architecture. Papers can include, but are not limited to: soils and their relationship to building practices and techniques; medicalization and health measurements; land and ecological governance; property rights and land-use schemes; cultivation and resource management through surveying technologies and agricultural infrastructures; representations of land; models of community and solidarity building through land traditions; labor; and methodologies of multispecies histories of architecture.This will be an in-person symposium_________________________________________

American Historical Association (AHA), January 4-7, 2024, San Francisco, CA
____________________________________ 

American Society for Environmental Historians (ASEH), April 3-7,2024, Denver Colorado
____________________________________ 
Organization for American Historians, April 11-14,2024, New Orleans, LA
The current cascade of crises—viral, racial, economic, political, constitutional and environmental—shape and shadow our communities and our nation. History and historians have a role to play in addressing these crises; documenting, writing, amplifying, and mediating stories that can inform our moment and promote social justice.Join the community in New Orleans, Louisiana or at the Virtual Conference Series in cooperation with NCPH, in 2024 as we honor and explore the ways in which individuals, communities, and historians work and learn together.

____________________________________ 

Society of Architectural Historians 2024 Annual International Conference (SAH), APRIL 17–21, 2024,  ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

Join the Society of Architectural Historians in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 17–21, 2024, for an immersive, in-person experience that includes paper sessions, events at off-site venues, and guided architecture tours in and around the city. Attendees can look forward to connecting with colleagues at social receptions, meeting publishers in the exhibit area, and conversing between sessions, all valued moments at the face-to-face conference.
____________________________________ 

Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH)October, 2024, San Diego, CA
_________________________________________OFFICERS President:
John Dean Davis, Ohio State UniversityVice President:
Ann Komara, CU DenverSecretary: 
Pollyanna Rhee, University of Illinois Urbana ChampagneNewsletter Editor: 
Thaisa Way, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and CollecitonAdvisory Board:Kathleen John-Alder, Rutgers UniversityJeanne Haffner, New York State Parks, Recreation, Historic Preservation, Jones Beach Energy & Nature CenterBianca Maria Rinaldi, Politecnico di TorinoJack Sullivan, University of MarylandFinola O’Kane Crimmins, University College DublinGeorges Farhat, University of Toronto_____________________
Take Note/ Resources;
______________________TEACHING AND PEDAGOGY
______________________

Check out the Institute of Historical Research- blog- On History: https://blog.history.ac.uk
______________________

Recent Books of Interest
_____________________ 
Here are books, and an article or two, with a historic narrative of landscape that have been published relatively recently:

Tate, Alan and Eaton, Marcella (2024).  Designed Landscapes: 37 Key Projects.  London and New York: Routledge / Taylor and Francis. 342 Pages, 303 Color Illustrations.  ISBN 9780367173098.

Kris, E., Parshall, L. B., Felfe, R., & Tchikine, A. (2023). The rustic style. Dumbarton Oaks, Trustees for Harvard University.

Biggs, Mathew, editor, 2023. Garden: Exploring the Horticultural World, Phaedon Press.

Padua, M. G. (2023) “Illuminating a Hidden Site: the Recovery of a Sacred Black Landscape”, Landscape Journal42(1) pp 53-75 https://doi.org/10.3368/lj.42.1.53

Wain, Anthony. 2023.  “Searching for Common Ground in the Gardens of the Past | AJLA.” Issue 5, Article 5. Accessed August 19, 2023. https://www.ajlajournal.org/articles/searching-for-common-ground-in-the-gardens-of-the-past.

Bsumek, Erika Marie. 2023. The Foundations of Glen Canyon Dam: Infrastructures of Dispossession on the Colorado Plateau. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Blackhawk, N. (2023). The Rediscovery of America : Native Peoples and the Unmaking of U.S. History. Yale University Press.

Whiteman, Stephen H. 2023. Landscape and Authority in the Early Modern World. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Avila, Eric, and Thaisa Way, eds, 2023. Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture 44, Segregation and Resistance in the Landscapes of the Americas. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Goldstein, Brian 2023, new, expanded edition The Roots of Urban Renaissance: Gentrification and the Struggle Over Harlem.





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SESAH Newsletter Nov. 2023



SESAH Newsletter

November 2023

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2023 SESAH Conference was a Success! 

The 2023 SESAH annual conference was held in Little Rock, Arkansas, September 27th-30th. A total of 125 registrants representing 25 states attended. Ethel Goodstein-Murphree delivered the keynote lecture Friday evening, held at the Old State House Museum and sponsored by the Fay Jones School of Architecture. Thank you to Ralph S. Wilcox and Mason Toms for chairing the conference! Thanks also to our conference sponsors including the Division of Arkansas Heritage, Preserve Arkansas, the Quapaw Quarter Association, WER Architects, the Capitol Zoning District Commission, the Old  State House Museum, Trapnall Hall, Revival Architecture, and Kudzu Collective. For additional information, check out the secretary’s report here.

Arris Volume 34 Out Now!

SESAH and UNC Press are pleased to announce that Volume 34 of Arris is now live on Project MUSE. Print copies have been mailed out, but you can access the new issue as well as back issues now. To access Arris, first go to UNC Press’s SESAH member access page and use the password sesah34 (all lowercase) in the password field. After you hit return a button will appear that says “Member Access to Arris.” Click on that button to access the journal.  

Articles 

Segregating Usonia: The Racial Politics of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fisher Housing 

Joseph M. Watson 

The Baltimore Exchange and Its Meanings 

Mark Reinberger 

Field Notes 

The Tropical Ranch: Examining the Ranch Style (1948–1970) on Everglades Island, Palm Beach, Florida 

Marie Penny 

Ligatures and Fusions: Joinery and Conjunction in Fay Jones’s Thorncrown Chapel (1980) and Mildred B. Cooper Memorial Chapel (1988) 

Torrey Tracy, Greg Herman 

Book Reviews 

Behind the Big House: Reconciling Slavery, Race, and Heritage in the U.S. South by Jodi Skipper (review) 

Amy E. Potter 

Atlantic Environments and the American South ed. by Thomas Blake Earle and D. Andrew Johnson (review) 

William Bryan 

The Material World of Eyre Hall: Four Centuries of Chesapeake History ed. by Carl R. Lounsbury (review) 

Robert M. Craig 

Out of Stock: The Warehouse in the History of Capitalism by Dara Orenstein (review) 

Patrick Haughey 

Stone Mountain House Burns! 

The 1850s Georgia plantation house at the center of the “Antebellum Plantation” attraction at Stone Mountain, opened in 1963, burned and is being called a “total loss” as of Tuesday, 11/14. The house is the focus of SESAH members Philip Mills Herrington and Lydia Mattice Brandt’s article “The 1960s Antebellum Plantation at Stone Mountain, Georgia” (JSAH, 2022), which won SESAH’s award for best article of 2022. The article chronicles and contextualizes the buildings 170-year history and documents details that were likely lost in the fire. 

Tyler Scholars Program applications now open! 

The Tyson Scholars of American Art program supports interdisciplinary scholarship that seeks to expand the boundaries and traditional categories of investigation into American art from any time period. Crystal Bridges and the Tyson Scholars Program invite PhD candidates (or equivalent), post-doctoral researchers, and senior scholars from any field who are researching American art to apply. Scholars may be focused on visual art, architecture, craft, visual and material culture, performance art, or new media. They also invite applications from scholars approaching US art transregionally and looking at the broader geographical context of the Americas, especially Latinx and Indigenous art.

Fellowships are residential and support full-time writing and research for terms that range from six weeks to nine months. While in residence, Tyson Scholars have access to the art and library collections of Crystal Bridges as well as the library and archives at the University of Arkansas in nearby Fayetteville. Stipends vary depending on the duration and candidate profile, ranging from $34,000 to $17,000 per semester plus housing, $1,500 for relocation expenses, and additional research funds upon application. Scholars are provided workspace in the curatorial wing of the Crystal Bridges Library. This year’s application cycle also includes a programming grant and publication prize. Applications are accepted until Nov. 29th. For more information, please visit the Tyson Scholars website here.

Submit to Arris! 

Call for Papers: Articles and Field Notes

Arris, the journal of the Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians, is accepting submissions for articles and field notes to be published in upcoming issues.

Articles generally run from 5,000-7,000 words and are blind peer-reviewed. They should demonstrate a rigorous mastery over the scholarly literature, research methods, field work (if applicable), and available primary sources of the subject. Articles should proceed beyond a descriptive approach to draw new conclusions or present new theoretical paradigms.

Field notes are shorter contributions, approximately 2,500 words in length, and are blind peer-reviewed. These notes discuss significant ongoing field work or other research of interest to SESAH members.

Only original work neither published previously nor under review for publication elsewhere will be considered.

There is no specific deadline for submissions, which are accepted on a rolling basis. If an article or field notes is accepted, but the issue in progress already has a sufficient number of them, it will be published in the next issue.

Submissions should follow Arris guidelines.

Member News

Danielle Wilkins Featured in Architectural Digest

Danielle Wilkins was featured in an Architectural Digest article looking at the effects of tourism on historic sites. Wilkins referenced her time as the 2015 H. Allen Brooks Traveling Fellow which she spent traveling the world to visit heritage sites. Read more here.

Poplar Forest Receives 2023 John Russell Pope Award

The architectural and landscape restorations of Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest was awarded the 2023 John Russell Pope Award for Artisanship by the Washington Mid Atlantic Chapter of the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art (ICAA). The Award for Artisanship recognizes the various handcrafted and fabrication trades involved in the construction or restoration of a work of architecture, interior design or landscape. “On behalf of the Board of Directors, I’d like to congratulate Travis McDonald, our recently retired director of architectural restoration and his team of artisans and craftspeople who devoted their time and energy to this project on winning this prestigious award,” said Jensie Teague, chairman of the Board of Directors. “Their craftsmanship is superb, and their dedication to restoring Jefferson’s villa, unparalleled. It is a masterwork that will be shared with generations to come.” Find more information here.

Docomomo Louisiana/Gulf South Chapter Launches

SESAH Preservation Officer, Jeff Rosenberg, has been involved with the relaunch of the former Docomomo New Orleans/Louisiana chapter as the Louisiana/Gulf South chapter of Docomomo US.  The relaunched chapter’s most recent event was a  screening of the documentary Designing Life: The Modernist Architecture of Albert Ledner in New Orleans on November 14th.  More information can be found at: https://www.docomomo-us.org/chapter/new-orleans-louisiana

New Mississippi and Louisiana State Reps.

Please join us in welcoming our new state representatives for Mississippi and Louisiana for the SESAH Board of Directors. Aaron White will fulfill the unexpired term of Chris Hunter, who has moved to Texas. Mary Springer fulfills the unexpired term of Nicholas Serrano, who moved to Florida.

Does your institution subscribe to Arris???

If not, encourage them to subscribe in one of 3 ways:

  1. Print subscription for $50 annually (1 issue) through UNC Press’s subscription fulfillment partners at Duke University Press. Contact:
    1. Email subscriptions@dukeupress.edu 
    2. Phone toll-free in the US and Canada (888) 651-0122 
    3. Phone (919) 688-5134 
  2. Digital subscriptions for $50 to Arris’s full catalog are available through ProjectMUSE. Arris is on their Hosted platform, so they will need to get a single title subscription through ProjectMUSE. 
  3. For both print and digital subscriptions for $60/year, reach out to Duke University Press at the contact info above.
READ MORE ON OUR WEBSITE 

Call for Elisabeth Walton Potter Research Award Submissions

The goal of this award program is to further awareness and knowledge of the built environment of the Pacific Northwest. The chapter will provide limited funds for focused projects by members that increase understanding of the region’s built environment and produce tangible results that can be made available for interested scholars and students.

The award amount is $500. 

To apply please email your submission to mariondeanross@gmail.com

Schedule:

Deadline for submission of application – February 14, 2024

Date for notification of grant award – March 1, 2024

Date for awarding of grant – March 15, 2024

Award update report – October 2024

Full award report due – 2025

SAH MDR 2024 Potter Award Criteria  

Research Funding

1.  Applicant must be a current SAH MDR Chapter member. 

  • Application must provide a current CV highlighting relevant education and experience.
  • Criteria for acceptance includes a realistic scope and timeline, as well as demonstration of a strong, original research question.

2. PROJECT NAME: A short descriptive title for the project. 

3. DESCRIPTION: Briefly describe the project, including the genesis, purpose, and need. Explain its contribution to the understanding of the built environment in the Pacific Northwest. If site specific, describe location. 

4. PRODUCT: Describe specific anticipated results of the project including, if applicable, quantity, users, accessibility, educational benefits or other pertinent information. Describe how Marion Dean Ross Chapter support will be acknowledged. 

5. TIME FRAME: State the estimated length of time to complete the project with anticipated beginning and end dates. 

6. AMOUNT: Specify the amount of money being requested. State the total amount to complete the project. If the amount requested from the Marion Dean Ross Chapter is less than the total, indicate how the remainder will be raised, so that the completion of the project is assured.

Categories
Monthly News

SAH Chapter News October 2023

Below are the SAH regional chapter news updates received by the liaison during the month of October 2023.

LANDSCAPE HISTORY CHAPTERof the Society of Architectural Historians
October 2023Anne Spencer’s garden and writing studio, Lynchburg, Virginia, https://www.annespencermuseum.org/

Ooops- It came to my attention i was not listing officers correctly and updated- now corrected.
 Thank you to all of our leaders for serving…

Dear colleagues:
Late October and Fall is here. We are delighted to share that Andrea Roberts (UVa), Kate Howell (UMD), Meghan Gough (VCU) and I have been awarded an NEH Summer Institute for 2024– ” A  People’s History of Landscape”- to be hosted at VCU in Richmond Virginia. Stay tuned. 

Please send announcements, inquiries, and any other materials you want included in our newsletter to  wayt01@do aks.org.   

Check out https://www.sahlandscape.org/. It would be helpful to expand our list of resources. If you are interested in helping us inventory resources, let me know. 

As always, I encourage you to share your publications with us. It would be great to have a list of books out in the past year or so- so let me know of your publications or the new books on your shelves. 

Best, Thaisa et al…
Director | Garden & Landscape Studies | Dumbarton Oaks | Trustees for Harvard University__________________________
CALL FOR PAPERS AND PROPOSALS__________________________

Plants and AnimalsInterdisciplinary ApproachesEditors: Susan McHughPatrícia VieiraPlants and Animals: Interdisciplinary Approaches aims to publish scholarly work that addresses common challenges across the fields of plant and animal studies from interdisciplinary perspectives. The series welcomes monographs and edited collections that focus and reflect upon interactions of plants, animals, and humans in innovative ways. At a time of large-scale anthropogenic species extinction, there is a pressing need to promote scholarship that can help us envision more equitable and harmonious forms of coexistence on the planet. The series therefore encourages submissions explicitly geared to build bridges not only between plant and animal studies, but also leading-edge research on other forms of life or ways of being, including fungi, lichens, algae and other microorganisms, as well as scholarship on fantasy creatures, cryptids, semi-living beings, and even non-living forms of existence. The goal is to abolish an artificially compartmentalized view of the world in order to add to the ways of knowing that are beginning to grow through the interconnections between these related fields of study. Grounded in the humanities, Plants and Animals welcomes trans-disciplinary perspectives that engage with scholarship in the social sciences and in the natural sciences.__________________________________CALL FOR PAPERS:
Online Journal Arcadia: Exploration in Environmental History
Annika Stanitzok (she/her) Arcadia (ISSN 2199-3408) is now inviting new submissions. Arcadia: Explorations in Environmental History is an open-access, peer-reviewed publication platform for short, illustrated, and engaging environmental histories. Embedded in a particular time and place, each story focuses on a site, event, person, organization, or species as it relates to nature and human society. By publishing digitally on the Environment & Society Portal, Arcadia promotes accessibility and visibility of original research in global environmental history and cognate disciplines. Each peer-reviewed article includes a profile of the researcher, links, and suggested readings.Contributors are free to choose their own environmentally themed topics, but for this volume we especially welcome submissions on historical events in Southeast Asia, North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Central Asia, and other areas currently underrepresented on this map.We also welcome proposals for interconnected contributions by individual authors or research groups. Let us know if you are interested in having your submission linked to an existing thematic Arcadia collection or if you would like to edit a new one. Existing Arcadia collections include: National Parks in Time and SpaceGlobal Environmental MovementsWater HistoriesThe Nature StateRights of Nature RecognitionDiseases and Pests in HistoryTerms of DisasterHistories across SpeciesTechnology and ExpertiseCoastal HistoryReligion and Place, and Notions and Nature.Contact Information: To submit, simply send a filled-out version of the sumission form, which you can find on our website here, together with your draft submission to Arcadia’s managing editor, Pauline Kargruber (arcadia@carsoncenter.lmu.de)—guidelines are included in the form. Your email should also include 2–5 images and/or multimedia (with permissions if necessary) and a profile photo.
https://www.environmentandsociety.org/arcadia/contribution ___________________________________ ASEH CALL FOR PRIZE NOMINATIONSAll deadlines are November 20, 2023.PRIZESEach year, ASEH awards five prizes for outstanding scholarshipin the field of environmental history. Please read the instructions for submitting your work for consideration for each prize listed below.George Perkins Marsh Prize for best book in environmental historyAlice Hamilton Prize for best article outside journal Environmental History Leopold-Hidy Prize for best article in journal Environmental History (with Forest History Society)Rachel Carson Prize for best dissertation in environmental historyASEH-FHS Graduate Student Essay Prize
___________________________________

JOBS AND OPPORTUNITIES
____________________________________ 
 Dumbarton Oaks “Democracy and Landscape” InitiativeDumbarton Oaks, a research institute of Harvard University located in Washington DC  announces a post-doctoral fellowship position in Democracy and Landscape. This is intended for an early career postdoctoral fellow in environmental history with a research focus on race, indigeneity, and/or settler colonialism as revealed in place and on land. 
 
Details regarding the position are available on our website: https://www.doaks.org/about/employment/post-doctoral-fellow-in-democracy-and-landscape-mellon-initiative
Review of applications will begin on December 15, 2023. 
 
___________________________________ 

Open positions at Mount Vernon, George Washington’s Home
Stewarded by the Mount Vernon Ladies

Full-time, one-year grant-funded position of Landscape Historian 
https://www.mountvernon.org/about/employment/open-positions-at-mount-vernon/

____________________________________ 
ASEH CALL FOR FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS
Deadline: November 20, 2023

The ASEH currently offers four research fellowships: the Hal Rothman Dissertation Fellowship, the J. Donald Hughes Graduate Research Fellowship, the Equity Graduate Student Fellowship, and the Samuel P. Hays Fellowship.The Rothman, Hughes, and Equity Fellowships are reserved for graduate students; the Hays Fellowship is open to all non-student practicing historians.In addition, the ASEH co-sponsors the ASEH–Newberry Library Fellowship for scholars who will work with the Newberry’s extensive holdings in Chicago. 
___________________________________________
 THE GARDEN CLUB OF AMERICA
SCHOLARSHIPS
For undergraduates, graduate students, and post graduates.. for more information: 
https://www.gcamerica.org/scholarships

___________________________________________

Call for Applications for Editor-in Chief and Editorial Assistant of Architectural Histories

Architectural Histories, the international, blind peer-reviewed, open access scholarly journal of the European Architectural History Network (EAHN) is now seeking to appoint a new Editor-in-Chief and Editorial Assistant to start on 1 January 2025, each for a four-year term. The new appointees will start working with the current team from 1 September 2024 and gradually take over their duties.

The positions of Editor-in-Chief and Editorial Assistant are not remunerated and expenses are not covered. The Editor-in-Chief’s average workload is one day per week, and the Editorial Assistant’s is 4 to 8 hours per week; both are subject to fluctuation.

Application
Applications should consist of a CV (max. 3 pages) and a cover letter (max. 2 pages) specifying the candidate’s motivation, skills and qualities. Applications should be emailed to the Editorial Search Committee by 31 January 2024, by care of secretary@eahn.orgMore information; https://eahn.org/2023/10/call-for-applications-for-editor-in-chief-and-editorial-assistant-of-architectural-histories/

___________________________________ 

2024 Practice Grant

The Practice Grant opens access and expands approaches to landscape design through its direct funding to individuals and groups committed to applied land-based practice. Past award winners are an excellent reference for the type of work they support, which ranges from design, ecology, gardening, farming, restoration, and conservation. All this information along with the application can be found on the Practice Foundation website
 
The application is simple and straight forward and is open now until December 1, 2023.

Additionally, the team at Practice Foundation is always happy to answer any questions. You can find them at grant@practicelandscape.com 

___________________________________ 
Landscape Journal
Landscape Journal welcomes submissions of original manuscripts that advance our understanding of land planning, design, policy, and management practices as well as their consequences. Manuscripts examining land planning, design, policy, and management outcomes over a range of geographic contexts and spatiotemporal scales are especially welcome. Contributions are invited from any disciplinary perspective.
 
Article Types
Landscape Journal strives to publish a diverse mix of articles and critical reviews.
 
1. Original Research (5,000–8,000 words)
Quantitative and qualitative empirical research, including historical analyses and rigorous comparative analyses of multiple case studies. 
 
2. Systematic Literature Reviews (5,000–10,000 words)
Syntheses of landscape theory and state-of-the-art design teaching, research, and professional practice. Systematic reviews identify knowledge gaps and inform research agendas.
 
3. Perspective Essays (2,000–5,000 words)
Perspectives from Practice essays reflect on contemporary practice advances, challenges, or opportunities—and comment on implications for teaching, research, and design practice.
 
4. Policy Briefs (3,000–6,000 words)
Evidence-based analyses of current policies and policy alternatives—whether enacted by governments, professions, or other institutions.
 
5. Critical Reviews (500–2,500 words)
Critical reviews of books, films, videos, conferences, websites, and software are welcome. Most book reviews are written within one year after the book’s publication date.
 
Authors who are interested in writing a critical review or perspective essay should first contact the editorial office. Proposals for special issues are also welcome.
 ___________________________________ 

CALL FOR JOURNAL CO-EDITORS
HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY- AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF GEOGRAPHERS
Michael Wise (he/his) 

Historical Geography is a peer-reviewed annual journal that publishes scholarly articles, book reviews, conference reports, and commentaries. Since 1993, the journal has encouraged an interdisciplinary dialogue among scholars, professionals, and students interested in geographic perspectives on the past. The journal is currently published by the University of Nebraska Press and distributed online through Project Muse. The journal is sponsored by the Historical Geography Specialty Group of the American Association of Geographers.
The journal is currently seeking two co-editors to replace outgoing co-editor Mike Wise (University of North Texas) and John Bauer (University of Nebraska-Kearny). Working with co-editor Chris Dando (University of Nebraska-Omaha), and the journal editorial board, the new co-editors will assist with manuscript solicitation, peer review and editing, as well as journal production and management. The position is voluntary and typically held for a 5-year term.
The journal is also currently seeking a new book review editor who will be responsible for actively curating a list of 20-30 book reviews per year in the field of historical geography.
We are seeking to build a team with interdisciplinary reach and especially invite environmental historians whose interests engage with critical geographical scholarship to contact us. Please email a CV and a short expression of interest (including mention of any institutional support) to Mike Wise (michael.wise@unt.edu) and Mark Rhodes (marhodes@mtu.edu) by November 1, 2023. Any questions about the journal or the position may be directed to them as well. These appointments will begin in 2024, with a transition period in Spring 2024.
 
______________________________
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS:
GUNSTON HALL

National Historic Landmark Update-ASALH- The Founders of Black history Month

The National Park Service (NPS) is seeking the services of a Principal Investigator (PI) or Principal  Investigator(s) through a cooperative agreement with the Association for the Study of African American Life  and History, Inc. (ASALH) to update the National Historic Landmark (NHL) nomination form for Gunston Hall  in Fairfax County, Virginia.
Gunston Hall was designated a NHL in 1960 (NRIS# 66000832) for its association with George Mason and his contributions to the nation’s founding principles, as well as for its architectural importance. The NPS is interested in updating the history and analysis included in the Gunston Hall NHL nomination to reflect a more expansive history that acknowledges the complexities of the period and the people involved. This includes adding information about the centrality of the institution of slavery in Mason’s life and accomplishments, about the people that Mason enslaved, acknowledgment of women’s roles and accomplishments, and a discussion of the complexities and contradictions of Mason and his ideas that inspired the Declaration of Independence.

National Historic Landmarks & National Register Coordinator
National Park Service
National Capital Region
NCR Website  https://www.nps.gov/RESSNCR
NHL Website http://www.nps.gov/nhl
__________________________________________________________

CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA

___________________________________________

American Historical Association (AHA), January 4-7, 2024, San Francisco, CA
____________________________________ 

American Society for Environmental Historians (ASEH), April 3-7,2024, Denver Colorado
____________________________________ 
Organization for American Historians, April 11-14,2024, New Orleans, LA
The current cascade of crises—viral, racial, economic, political, constitutional and environmental—shape and shadow our communities and our nation. History and historians have a role to play in addressing these crises; documenting, writing, amplifying, and mediating stories that can inform our moment and promote social justice.Join the community in New Orleans, Louisiana or at the Virtual Conference Series in cooperation with NCPH, in 2024 as we honor and explore the ways in which individuals, communities, and historians work and learn together.

____________________________________ 

Society of Architectural Historians 2024 Annual International Conference (SAH), APRIL 17–21, 2024,  ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

Join the Society of Architectural Historians in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 17–21, 2024, for an immersive, in-person experience that includes paper sessions, events at off-site venues, and guided architecture tours in and around the city. Attendees can look forward to connecting with colleagues at social receptions, meeting publishers in the exhibit area, and conversing between sessions, all valued moments at the face-to-face conference.
____________________________________ 

Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH)October, 2024, San Diego, CA
_________________________________________OFFICERS (updated and corrected)President:
John Dean Davis, Ohio State UniversityVice President:
Ann Komara, CU DenverSecretary: 
Pollyanna Rhee, University of Illinois Urbana ChampagneNewsletter Editor: 
Thaisa Way, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and CollecitonAdvisory Board:Kathleen John-Alder, Rutgers UniversityJeanne Haffner, New York State Parks, Recreation, Historic Preservation, Jones Beach Energy & Nature CenterBianca Maria Rinaldi, Politecnico di TorinoJack Sullivan, University of MarylandFinola O’Kane Crimmins, University College DublinGeorges Farhat, University of Toronto_____________________
Take Note/ Resources;
______________________TEACHING AND PEDAGOGY
______________________

Check out the Institute of Historical Research- blog- On History: https://blog.history.ac.uk
______________________

Recent Books of Interest
_____________________ 
 Elisabeth Blair MacDougall Book AwardThe Elisabeth Blair MacDougall Book Award was established in 2005 to recognize annually the most distinguished work of scholarship in the history of landscape architecture or garden design. Named for SAH past president and landscape historian Elisabeth MacDougall, the award honors the late historian’s role in developing this field of study.Anatole Tchikine and Pierre de la Ruffinière du Prey
Francesco Ignazio Lazzari’s Discrizione della villa pliniana: Visions of Antiquity in the Landscape of Umbria
Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, 2021

_____________________ Here are books, and an article or two, with a historic narrative of landscape that have been published relatively recently:

Kris, E., Parshall, L. B., Felfe, R., & Tchikine, A. (2023). The rustic style. Dumbarton Oaks, Trustees for Harvard University.

Biggs, Mathew, editor, 2023. Garden: Exploring the Horticultural World, Phaedon Press.

Padua, M. G. (2023) “Illuminating a Hidden Site: the Recovery of a Sacred Black Landscape”, Landscape Journal42(1) pp 53-75 https://doi.org/10.3368/lj.42.1.53

Wain, Anthony. 2023.  “Searching for Common Ground in the Gardens of the Past | AJLA.” Issue 5, Article 5. Accessed August 19, 2023. https://www.ajlajournal.org/articles/searching-for-common-ground-in-the-gardens-of-the-past.

Bsumek, Erika Marie. 2023. The Foundations of Glen Canyon Dam: Infrastructures of Dispossession on the Colorado Plateau. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Blackhawk, N. (2023). The Rediscovery of America : Native Peoples and the Unmaking of U.S. History. Yale University Press.

Whiteman, Stephen H. 2023. Landscape and Authority in the Early Modern World. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Avila, Eric, and Thaisa Way, eds, 2023. Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture 44, Segregation and Resistance in the Landscapes of the Americas. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Goldstein, Brian 2023, new, expanded edition The Roots of Urban Renaissance: Gentrification and the Struggle Over Harlem.





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From: SAHSCC <info@sahscc.org>
Date: October 27, 2023 at 3:35:08 PM PDT
To: slisgirl@gmail.com
Subject: Last Chance! Detroit Moscow Detroit
Reply-To: info@sahscc.org









AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:
Detroit-Moscow-Detroit
Zoom Presentation
Sunday, October 29th, 1:00 PM PST
Join author/editor Christina E. Crawford and author/co-editor Claire Zimmerman for a look at the book Detroit-Moscow-Detroit: An Architecture for Industrialization, 1917-1945 (MIT Press, 2023). They will discuss the book’s exploration of the similarities and differences between the hyper-industrialization that took place in the USSR and the US during three critical decades. Read more…


Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…
Read more…




Purchase $5 ticket!

Events of InterestHi Amanda,Please see below for some upcoming events of interest for our members!All the best,The NESAH BoardHistoric New England Summit 2023November 2-3, 2023The VETS, Providence, Rhode Island, and LivestreamThe annual Historic New England Summit presents two days of exciting conversations that explore how 21st-century challenges and opportunities are transforming the fields of historic preservation, architecture, urban planning, conservation, arts and culture, museum studies, collections management, public history, and education.The program includes keynote presentations by regional and national leaders, panel discussions, provocations, networking opportunities, and more.For more information and to register click here.Health Equity in Architectureat the Intersection of Teaching, Archive and CuratingNovember 4, 202310:00 am (EST)ZoomThis panel aims to discuss the following questions with a global perspective:• What are some of the substantial gaps in the teaching and historical documentation of health equity in architecture?• What can be done to fill these gaps?• How can teaching, archival, and curatorial communities in architectural his/herstory develop productive collaborations to support post-pandemic teaching in architecture and health equity?For questions, please visit epidemicurbanism.com or email epidemicurbanism@gmail.com.For the zoom link, please visit: https://epidemicurbanism.wordpress.com/2021/07/25/upcoming/Boston’s Franklin Park:Olmsted, Recreation and the Modern CityNovember 8, 20236:00 pmBoston Public Library, Rabb HallProfessor Ethan Carr of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst will lecture on his new book, Boston’s Franklin Park: Olmsted, Recreation and the Modern Citywhich details the history of Franklin Park from its conception to the current era of park revival. This talk is sponsored by the Library of American Landscape History (LALH) and the Leventhal Map and Education Center of the Boston Public Library.The lecture will be held in Rabb Hall at the Central Branch of the Boston Public Library (Copley Square). The program concludes at 7 p.m. followed by a book signing. Free and open to the public.To register for the event click here.



AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Detroit-Moscow-DetroitZoom PresentationSunday, October 29th, 1:00 PM PSTJoin author/editor Christina E. Crawford and author/co-editor Claire Zimmerman for a look at the book Detroit-Moscow-Detroit: An Architecture for Industrialization, 1917-1945 (MIT Press, 2023). They will discuss the book’s exploration of the similarities and differences between the hyper-industrialization that took place in the USSR and the US during three critical decades. Read more…Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!Photo: Stalingrad Tractor Plant, Stalingrad, Russia, USSR, 1929. Volgograd Tractor Factory Museum (Muzei OOO VMK VgTZ)..Read more
Categories
Monthly News

SAH Chapter News September 2023

Below are the SAH regional chapter news updates received by the liaison during the month of September 2023.

2023 Conference Reminders 

PLEASE BOOK ROOMS DIRECTLY THROUGH THE HOTEL USING THE SESAH DISCOUNT (CODE SSH)!!!

Please make your hotel reservations for the 2023 SESAH Conference at the Doubletree by Hilton Hotel in downtown Little Rock as soon as possible. When you make the reservation be sure to use the SESAH conference code “SSH” to receive the $149/night discounted rate within the SESAH room block. Or, Click Here to Reserve your room

If you already made your reservations through a third party such as Expedia, please let Robbie Jones know. We need to ensure that SESAH gets credit for your stay. 

If you’re looking at other hotels, please stay at the Doubletree instead. We have a contract with the hotel to sell a minimum number of room nights, and right now we have not hit our minimum. The room nights ensure the fees for the session venue rentals are waived. Otherwise, we will be required to pay for any unsold room nights at $149/night plus penalties.Conference Registration closes September 13th. Click here to register. For additional information on the conference, please visit our website here.


NEWSLETTER OF THE NORTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIANS VOLUME 26, NUMBER 2 Fall 2023Photo: Aerial view San Diego iStockphoto––continued on page 3NCCSAH Fall Program Draws Us to the West Coast’s “Plymouth Rock” NCCSAH president, Ward Hill interviewed architectural historian Diane Kane, who created our San Diego program for this fall. What follows is a response to Ward’s inquiry about the highlights of the tour she has planned for us.Known as the “Plymouth Rock” of the West Coast, San Diego is one of America’s oldest cities; yet it is also one of its newest cities, with most of its built environment from the last 100 years. Once a health-seekers haven and a Navy town, tourism and real estate are now the biggest industries, with bio-tech and edu-cation fast becoming major economic driv-ers. I focused the tour on neighborhoods with interesting histories that create a dia-logue between the past and present. The tour hotel, Le Pensione, is in Little Italy. Once a mixed-use Italian neighbor-hood, it was decimated by the construction of the I-5 Freeway. Today it has an ener-getic, youthful vibe with fabulous eateries, hip boutiques and pedestrian amenities. The LIND block (1999-2002), is a redevel-opment project designed by six prominent San Diego Post-Modernists. They com-bined their talents to create a city block of new and salvaged building parts that pro-vide a sense of “invented history.” The nearby Beaumont Building (Rob Welling-ton Quigley, 1988) contributes to this fanci-ful narrative. After lunch on Tuesday, we’ll stroll the Gaslamp National His-toric Landmark District (1870-1900). At Padres Stadium, we will learn about the “Ballpark Settlement Agreement.” This landmark legal case resulted in adaptively re-using a signifi-cant collection of historic warehouses in East Village (1900-1930), including one that serves as the stadium’s left field foul line! Architect Rob Quigley will lead a tour of his splendid design for the Central Library (2013) and his nearby home/office.

2 NCCSAHAerial view downtown San Diego, 1935, 10 years after death of J.D. Spreckels Photo: clerk files.sandiego.govSon of San Francisco’s Sugar King “Discovers” San DiegoView of San Diego in 1887, the year John D. Spreckels “discov-ered” the small town for which he saw a great future. Photo: clerkfiles.sandiego.gov—continued on page 6 The European discovery of the Bay of San Diego was made by a Portuguese nav-igator sailing for Spain, in 1542. There is no record of another Eu-ropean visit to the area for 60 years. At that time, 1602, the bay was named San Diego, and the first church was built. Yet another interval of sixty plus years ensued, when rumors spread during the 1760s that Russia was planning expansion from Alaska to the coast of California. At that prospect, King Carlos III of Spain set in motion events that would result in the first colonizing expedition into Upper California. Leading the effort were Gaspar de Por-tola, military governor, and Father Serra, leader of the effort to establish missions in the territory. The first of what would become a chain of 21 missions, Mission San Diego de Alcala, was founded in 1769.Among the earliest non-indigenous Americans to have contact with San Diego, were Boston traders, such as those whose voyage Richard Henry Dana chronicled, in Two Years Before the Mast. On a homeward stop, Dana records, “We were always glad to see San Diego. . .a snug little place, and seeming quite like home, especially to me, who had spent a summer [1835] there.”Twenty-four years later (1859), on a visit to Califor-nia that he recounts, it’s fair to say that Dana was—in modern parlance—blown away by the sight of a full-fledged city as he sailed into San Francisco Bay, and he found signs of growth, though on a much more modest scale, in Los Angeles, as well. But, he reported, “The little town of San Diego has undergone no change whatever that I can see. It certainly has not grown. It is still, like Santa Barbara, a Mexican town. The four principal houses of the gente de ra-zon—of the Bandinis, Estudillos, Argüellos, and Picos are the chief houses now; but all the gentle-men––and their families, too, I believe are gone. . . . I must complete my acts of pious re-membrance, so I take a horse and make a run out to the old Mission. . . . All has gone to decay. The buildings are unused and ruinous, and the large gardens show now only wild cactuses, willows, and a few olive-trees.”Of course, by the time of Dana’s second sojourn (1859), California had entered the Union, and San Francisco’s population had exploded, thanks to its

––continued from page 1A late afternoon tour of Balboa Park will explore the his-tory of the Spanish Colonial Revival Style, first intro-duced by architect Bertram Goodhue at 1915 Panama California Exhibition. Preservation archi-tect David Marshall will discuss the process of renewing once tempo-rary buildings from 1915 & 1935 exhibitions with more permanent materials, while landscape histo-rian Nancy Carol Carter will iden-tify exotic plants introduced by horticulturalist Kate Sessions. Wednesday morning, the trolley takes us into Old Town State Park, where a mixture of adobe and wooden buildings (c. 1830-1870) sur-round the rectangular plaza laid out per the Spanish Law of the Indies. At the newly refurbished Serra Museum (Richard Requa, 1930) we’ll view a new exhibition on the Presidio. We’ll next explore neighbor-hoods on both sides of the San Diego River, including Craftsman Era Mission Hills (1910-1930), the trendy gay neighborhood Hillcrest, the new SDSU West Cam-pus and Civita Park (2020), site of an abandoned quar-ry. We’ll see how the trolley and restoration of the San Diego River are transforming this narrow corridor into a high-density neighborhood rich with natural amenities. On Thursday, the trolley will take us north to UCSD, one of the nation’s top STEM campuses and innovators in bio-tech, to enjoy its fabulous collection of modern ar-chitecture. Highlights include William Pereira’s Geisel Library (1970), the Stuart Art Collection and nearby Salk Institute (Louis Kahn, 1965). In La Jolla, we’ll visit the historic Irving Gill “Cultural Zone” (1908-1930), an-chored by the SD Museum of Contemporary Art, recent-ly renovated by Minimalist New York architect Annabelle Seldorf.I am excited to share San Diego with you and look for-ward to a fun and intellectually stimulating visit for NCCSAH members. San Diego Geisel Library, UC San Diego. Photo: UCSDPhoto above: Diane KaneFor biographical information, go to:Diane Kane, Architectural Historian – friendsofsdarch.com

4 NCCSAHSpring Program Explored Maybeck’s Berkeley WorksOn June 8th NCCSAH celebrated the great Bay Area architect Bernard Maybeck in an event at the University of California, Berkeley, Faculty Club, a Maybeck design dating from 1902. Our thanks to Christine Berlin, the club’s catering manager, for many hours spent organizing our morning event and lunch. The day started with coffee and pastries in the Hyens Room where we viewed the splendid documentary, Pursing Beauty: The Architecture of Bernard Maybeck,made by award winning film maker Paul Bockhorst. The film features fascinating interviews with many prominent architectural historians such as Richard Longstreth and Robert Judson Clark. The film also has several charming and touching interviews with enthusi-astic owners of Maybeck houses.We deeply regret Paul Bockhorst could not join us for the screening of his film, Pursuing Beauty, because of an injury that prevented him from traveling from his home in Southern California. We had many Bockhorst Productions documentaries on DVDs for sale at the event. Following the film, geographer Gray Brechin (who also appears prominently in the film) discussed Maybeck’s architecture and showed many slides of the master’s rarely seen drawings. We appreciated having Gray share with us his vast knowledge of the architect and his work. The morning ended with lunch in the Faculty Club “Great Room,” one of Maybeck’s most magnificent spaces.After lunch, Gray led the group to the Hearst Memorial Gym, the only Maybeck collaboration with Julia Mor-gan, to view the beautiful swimming pool and surround-ing sculpture. We then continued south to see what many consider to be Maybeck’s greatest and most in-ventive building: The First Church of Christ Scientist, Berkeley. The President of The Friends of First Church, Lynn Bohannon, gave us a tour of this truly spectacular building, providing many insights into its design and construction. Thanks to Ms Bohannon for her fascinat-ing insights into Maybeck’s magnum opus and for mak-ing it possible for us to see this remarkable building.Photos: top to bottom: Gray Brechin and Jan Berckfeldt, ED the May-beck Foundation, at portrait of Maybeck; photo: Paul Turner. Pause for lunch in the Great Hall, UC Faculty Club; photo: Paul Turner. Sun-day School Addition, Christian Science Church; photo: Phil Bellman.

NCCSAH 5 Photo Gallery: NCCSAH Berkeley Maybeck TourPhotos: top left, Great Hall, UC Faculty Club; photo: Bill Kostura. Top right, Lynn Bohannon addresses our group at Berkeley’s First Church Christ, Scientist; photo: Paul Turner. Bottom left, Hearst Memorial Gym, UC; photo: Paul Turner. Bottom right, detail Christian Science Church; photo: Jane Shabaker

6 NCCSAH 5th Avenue Streetcar, in 1912. Spreckels acquired San Diego’s horsecar lines and converted them to electric service. Photo: Digital Archives City of San Diego. sandiedo.govGaslamp Quarter, Old City Hall, San Diego. Photo: Wikipediaproximity to gold country. Census figures show that San Diego’s population about the time of Dana’s second visit stood at 731. Its population grew only modestly, until the 1890 census record-ed 16,159 residents, a striking 512.8 percent in-crease over 1880. The arrival of a long-awaited transcontinental rail link in 1885 contributed to the increase but did not bring the hoped-for prosperity.It was just two years after the arrival of the railroad that John D. Spreckels, scion of the wealthy San Francisco family, first visited San Diego (1887). He dropped anchor there in his yacht to restock supplies. He saw great potential and moved quick-ly to profit from that potential. He was not the first.Spreckels biographer, Sandra E. Bonura, writes (Empire Builder: John D. Spreckels and the Mak-ing of San Diego. U. of Nebraska Press, 2020), “‘Modern’ San Diego’s history began in 1867, when. . .Alonzo Erastus Horton arrived from San Francisco and saw potential in the ‘little old rem-nant of a Spanish town’.” He quickly began to ac-quire tracts of land near the waterfront and sold off lots for potential development, encouraged by the hope of a transcontinental rail link. The Panic of 1871 put an end to the possibility of a rail connec-tion to San Diego any time soon, and with it, an end to Horton’s dreams. If, in Bonura’s words, Horton was, “The Father of San Diego”, then John D. Spreckels was, she writes, “The Foster Father of San Diego.”John Diedrich Spreckels (1853-1926), son of German immigrant parents, Claus and Anna Christina Spreckels, was born in Charleston South Carolina. In 1856, after a brief residence in New York City, the family moved to San Francisco, where Claus ran a brewery. By the mid-1860s, he settled on the busi-ness that would bring him great wealth and earn him recognition as California’s “Sugar King.”John joined the family business after 1872. He over-saw various operations, including the company’s in-terests in the Kingdom of Hawaii, where he lived for a time, before settling in San Francisco. He was a San Francisco resident at the time of his “discovery” of San Diego, and though his financial interests increas-ingly focused on the Southern California town, he remained a San Franciscan until he relocated with his family to San Diego following the 1906 earth-quake.From San Francisco, Spreckels oversaw his San Diego interests, developing vital infrastructure, in-cluding the securing of a source of water, purchasing the street railway and replacing the horse-drawn transit service with an electric streetcar system (1892). He also acquired two newspapers, The San Diego Union, in 1890, and the San Diego Evening Tribune, in 1901. —continued on page 7––continued from page 2

NCCSAH 7 Early on in his focus on San Diego, Spreckels had a hand in development of the famed Hotel Del Coronado (opened 1888). It was under construc-tion when an economic slump threw the project into crisis. John D. provided financial assistance to keep the work going. In the end he bought out the developers and retained ownership until his death, in 1926. His heirs continued to hold the property until 1948 (unusual, since the Spreckels heirs, as historian Bonura points out, divested themselves of John’s assets fairly quickly).Although he claimed he was “not a philanthropist”, Spreckels did contribute much to the pub-lic good. He provided substan-tial support for the founding of the now-famous San Diego Zoo, and he built theaters and a library. He was a booster and financial supporter of the Panama-California Exposition, to “showcase” San Diego, the first American port en route from the Panama Canal. The expo’s built legacy is still very much on view.John D. typically did not seek publicity for acts of generosi-ty. Years ago, baseball’s Ted Williams told of growing up in a San Diego suburb with a single mom. With the family in straitened circumstances, and threatened with the loss of their home, John Spreckels quietly paid off the mortgage. Spreckels became a multi-millionaire and, far and away, the wealthiest man in San Diego. As a partial listing of his assets (taken from Bonu-ra) illustrates, his interests were widespread. “At various times, he owned all of North Island, the San Diego and Coronado Ferry Company, the Union-Tribune Publishing Co., the San Diego Electric Railway Com-pany, the San Diego & Arizona Railway, and the Mis-sion Beach Amusement Center, which became Bel-mont Amusement Park. He had built several down-town buildings. . .including the Union Building, the Spreckels Theater and office building, the Hotel San Diego, and the Golden West Hotel and much more.” John Spreckels bought out developers of the Hotel del Coro-nado when the project had financial difficulties. His heirs re-tained ownership until 1948. Photo: San Diego History Center Spreckels Theatre. Photo: c. James Seggie/themadeshutter.com.jpg—continued on page 9

8 NCCSAHSan Francisco: Is It The City that Used to Know How? October 14, 1911, at the ceremonial groundbreaking for the Panama Pacific International Exposition (held in Golden Gate Park, since the fair grounds had not be yet been chosen), President Taft de-clared San Francisco to be “The city that knows how.” When that fair opened in February of 1915, among its wonders was a massive pipe organ, reportedly the seventh largest organ in the world at that time. After the fair, the company formed by civic and business leaders to finance and manage the exposition gave the organ to the City. It was installed in Civic Auditorium, which was also a gift of the expo com-pany. An official city organist performed regular concerts for several years, and the opera and symphony made occasional use of the in-strument until the Opera House opened, in 1932. Summer pops pro-grams, offered from about 1950 until the opening of Davies Sym-phony Hall, occasionally included a work that featured the organ. In San Diego, John D. Spreckels and his brother Adolph commis-sioned Austin Organs, Inc., the same company that built the Exposi-tion instrument for the PPIE, to build an organ for their city. The brothers donated the instrument and commissioned the Spreckels Organ Pavilion, built 1914, in Balboa Park for the Panama-California Exposition. It is said to be the world’s largest pipe organ in a “fully outdoor venue”.A project to renovate and restore the San Francisco in-strument began in the mid-1980s. It was nearly com-pleted when the 1989 earthquake damaged the organ. In late 1991, the City returned it to Austin Organs, Inc., in Hartford, Connecticut (where it had been built, 75 years earlier) for repairs. Meanwhile, several months after the project to restore the organ began, the city made other plans for Civic Auditorium and, deciding not to continue with the instrument’s restoration, or-dered its return to San Francisco, where it went into storage beneath Civic Center Plaza. It languishes there to this day.Over time, proposals to bring the great Exposition or-gan back have surfaced. In 1998, San Francisco pro-posed installing the instrument in an organ pavilion at the plaza in front of the Ferry Building, now freed from the blight of the Embarcadero Freeway. However, a 2004 bond measure that would have included funding for the pavilion failed at the ballot box.Meanwhile, these days, although there are citizen advocates who still hope to bring the organ back to life in a new home, locally, it sounds like the City of San Francisco may be looking for someone—anyone, any-where—to take the Exposition organ off its hands. (See Peter Hartlaub, “A 40-ton organ sits under City Hall. San Francisco is trying to give it away,” S.F. Chronicle, August 18, 2023) In San Diego. . .the City offers Sun-day organ concerts on its exposition instrument year-round, as well as special concerts, free of charge.Photos: Festival Hall PPIE, expositionorgan.org; Spreckels Organ Pavilion: spreckelsorgan.org

NCCSAH 9 John D. Spreckels: In His Own Words—continued from page 7“The San Diego bug got me!”“I was out to find a big opportunity to do big con-structive work on a big scale—and in San Diego I thought I foresaw just such a chance. So I started to buy real estate, to erect buildings, to finance enterprise, and to develop our local re-sources. In short, I began to lay foundations deep and wide enough to carry the big ideas I had of helping to turn a bankrupt village into a city.”While one of every fifteen San Diegans worked for Spreckels by 1910, and he paid 10% of the property taxes in the county, not everyone laud-ed him. He responded to his critics: “How long do you progressive men mean to stand for this sort of small town stuff? It paralyzes progress, it punctures prosperity; in short, it hurts San Diego, not me. Think it over, gentlemen, and see if you do not think it is about time to make up. I do”He could be impatient: “What is the matter with San Diego? Why is it not the metropolis and seaport that its geographical and other unique advantages entitle it to be? Why does San Diego always just miss the train, somehow?”“Gentlemen, I love San Diego.”—Sandra E. Bonura, Empire Builder: John D. Spreckels and the Making of San Diego.San Diego Population1850650 1860 73118702,300 1880 2,637189016,159 (512.8% over 1880)190017,700 1910 39,578192074,361 1930 147,9951940203,341 1950 333,8651960573,224 2020 1,386,960For a detailed account of the San Francisco or-gan: Google “Pulling Out All the Stops to Save a 40-Ton, 100-Year-Old World’s Fair Pipe Or-gan,” by Ben Marks, January 17, 2014. See also Friends of the Exposition Organ San Francisco.Over time, Spreckels was president of several companies, including the Oceanic Steamship Company, the Coronado Water Company, the San Diego and Coronado Ferry Company, the San Diego and Coronado Transfer Company, the San Diego Electric Railway, and the San Diego & Arizona Railway Company.On a final visit to San Francisco, a cold day in January 1925, John Spreckels dedicated a pipe organ, at San Francisco’s Palace of the Legion of Honor. He commissioned the instrument as a memorial for his recently deceased brother, Adolph, who with his wife, Alma, had funded the museum’s construction. John D. Spreckels died, in Coronado, on June 7, 1926. His ashes were interred in the family mausoleum at Cypress Lawn, Colma. Two months later, the City of San Diego held a memorial service at the Spreckels Organ Pavil-ion. In his address to the more than 2000 peo-ple in attendance, the mayor reminded San Diegans of John’s importance to the city: “. . .everywhere you turn, transportation sys-tems, great buildings, banks, parks, beach con-struction, water development, everything that touches our city life has been advanced by his work. . . .”

10 NCCSAHSchedule for San Diego Tour October 17-19Tuesday, October 17, 2023SD Airport to Le Pensione, 660 West Date Street, Little Italy12:00 -12:45 pm Gather for lunch at Little Italy Food Hall (550 West Date Street near the hotel)12:45 – 1:00 Walk to Blue Line Trolley (West Cedar/Kettner two blocks from Hotel) travel to 5th Ave.1:00 – 2:15 walking tour of Gaslamp Quarter (Gaslamp Quarter Association)2:30 – 3:45 Tour Petco Park, Library, East Village3:45 – 4:00 Gaslamp Quarter/Convention Center(Petco Park) Green Line Trolley (return to hotel)4:45 – 5:00 Taxi/Uber or Charter Bus to Balboa Park 5:00 – 6:30 Balboa Park Tour, including Botanical Garden, Organ Pavilion, Alcazar Garden6:30 – 8:00 Prado Building and Gardens. Dinner El Prado restaurant .8:00 – 8:15 Taxi/Uber or bus back to hotel Wednesday, October 18, 20239:00 – 9:30Meet in hotel lobby, walk to the Blue Line, Little Italy/County Center stop (two blocks from hotel) 9:30 – 10:00 travel Blue Line Trolley to Old Town State Park 10:00 – 12:00 Old Town State Park tour12:00 – 1:00 pm lunch at Fiesta de Reyes in Old Town1:00 – 4:30 Charter Bus to Presidio Park & Serra Museum, Civita Park and San Diego River Restoration4:30 – 5:00 return to Hotel. Dinner on your own in Little Italy.Thursday, October 19, 20239:00Meet in hotel lobby walk to the Blue Line station Little Italy/County Center stop (near West Cedar/Ket-tner two blocks from hotel) 9:30 – 10:00 travel to UCSD10:00 – 12:00 UC San Diego Central Campus Tour (Design & Innovation Building, Epstein Amphitheater, Geisel Library, Stuart Art Collection, Engineering Complex, Ridge Walk, Torrey Pines & Learning Center)12:00 – 1:00 pm buffet lunch at UCSD Faculty Club1:00 – 1:30 travel by Charter Bus from Faculty Club to Salk Institute1:30 – 2:30 tour of the Salk Institute2:30 – 3:00 Travel to La Jolla Cultural District and Museum of Contemporary Art3:00 – 4:00 Tour MOCA (Kathryn Kanjo, museum curator)4:00 – 5:30 Tour Cultural District in La Jolla5:30-6:00 Charter Bus back to the Hotel/Dinner on your own or return to Bay Area (last flights c. 9:00 pm)

California Historical SocietyExhibition: Rare, Historical, and Curious: Selections from the CHS Collections, presented in the street-lev-el windows at678 Mission St., San Francisco https://www.californiahistoricalsociety.orgNational Trust for Historic PreservationPastForward National Preservation Conference.November 8-10, 2023. Washington, DChttp://www.pastforwardconference.org/pastforward19/DOCOMOMOWalking tour: Revisiting Urban Renewal in Western Addition. Cathedral of St. Mary of the Assumption, 1111 Gough St., San Francisco. October 14, 2023, 10:00 am – 12 noon. docomomo-us.org/eventsSan Francisco HeritageHeritage Happy Hour: no-host gathering, 5-7 pm, 2nd Thursday each month, at a registered Legacy Bar or Restaurant. See schedule: sfheritage.orgMembership DuesIs your membership current? At $30 per year, NCCSAH membership is still a great deal. Please see the coupon on the last page for details.Berkeley Historical SocietyWalking tours: September 23 & 24, October 7 &14, November 11. berkhistory.orgEvents Calendar20th Annual Architecture + the City Festival, Through September 30, 2023, presented by the Center for Architecture + Design with AIA San Francisco. Events celebrating San Francisco’s his-toric and emerging architecture. centersf.orgRegistration: San Diego Tour[please print]Name _____________________________Affiliation __________________________Address ___________________________City/State/Zip _______________________Email address ______________________Telephone number ___________________Number of places on the tour:_____ Members @ $250 $__________ Non-members @ $280 $_____Price for non-members includes one-year NCCSAH membershipTotal enclosed: $ _________Please make checks payable to NCCSAH and mail to: Ward Hill—San Diego Tour 3124 Octavia Street, #102 San Francisco, CA 94123NCCSAH 11Oakland Heritage AllianceLecture: Sam’l of Posen Comes to Oakland! Richard Schwartz. September 21, 2023, 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm. Chapel of the Chimes, Oakland. oaklandheritage.orgBerkeley Architectural Heritage AssociationAnnual House Tour: September 17, 2023: Marking 100th anniversary of the Berkeley Fire. Virtual lecture: Wildfires in Berkeley: Where Are We Today?berkeleyheritage.comCalifornia Preservation FoundationSoliciting ideas for CPF conference, in Los Angeles, spring of 2024. Proposals due August 31, 2023. californiapreservation.orgProgram is fully booked. To get on a waiting list, contact Ward Hill, whill@pacbell.netRemember, you do not have to be a member of the National SAH to become a member of NCCSAHJoin or Renew Now!!Individual $30.00Make checks payable to NCCSAHTo become a member of the Northern California Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historiansor to renew your membershipreturn this form and your dues check for $30 made out to NCCSAH toWard Hill, NCCSAH3124 Octavia StreetSan Francisco, CA 94123 Name ________________________________ Affiliation ______________________________ Occupation ____________________________ Street Address _________________________ City, State, Zip _________________________ Cell Phone ____________________________ Home Phone __________________________ E-mail address _________________________NCCSAH is a 501(c)(3) organizationPlease send your ideas or comments concerning The Newsletter to


AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Cronan on Southern California ModernismZoom PresentationSunday, September 24th, 1:00 PM PST
A new look at how modernism came to dominate in Southern California… Read more…
Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…

Chapter News, September 2023

LANDSCAPE HISTORY CHAPTER of the Society of Architectural Historians
August 2023 With the start of a new academic year, we honor a long history of university landscapes and gardens. Established in 1224 by Frederick II, Holy Roman EmperorUniversity of Naples Federico II in Italy is the world’s oldest state-funded university in continuous operation.

Dear colleagues:
I hope the term has started well for you who are beginning the year- and for those who are in the middle of their academic year, our best to you as you enter the spring term.

Please send announcements, inquiries, and any other materials you want included in our newsletter to  wayt01@do aks.org.   

Check out https://www.sahlandscape.org/. It would be helpful to expand our list of resources. If you are interested in helping us inventory resources, let me know. 

As always, I encourage you to share your publications with us. It would be great to have a list of books out in the past year or so- so let me know of your publications or the new books on your shelves. 

Best, Thaisa et al…
Director | Garden & Landscape Studies | Dumbarton Oaks | Trustees for Harvard University
  ______________________________________________________________ 

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PROPOSALS

___________________________________ CALL FOR PAPERS:
Online Journal Arcadia: Exploration in Environmental History
Annika Stanitzok (she/her)  Arcadia (ISSN 2199-3408) is now inviting new submissions. Arcadia: Explorations in Environmental History is an open-access, peer-reviewed publication platform for short, illustrated, and engaging environmental histories. Embedded in a particular time and place, each story focuses on a site, event, person, organization, or species as it relates to nature and human society. By publishing digitally on the Environment & Society Portal, Arcadia promotes accessibility and visibility of original research in global environmental history and cognate disciplines. Each peer-reviewed article includes a profile of the researcher, links, and suggested readings.Contributors are free to choose their own environmentally themed topics, but for this volume we especially welcome submissions on historical events in Southeast Asia, North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Central Asia, and other areas currently underrepresented on this map.We also welcome proposals for interconnected contributions by individual authors or research groups. Let us know if you are interested in having your submission linked to an existing thematic Arcadia collection or if you would like to edit a new one. Existing Arcadia collections include: National Parks in Time and SpaceGlobal Environmental MovementsWater HistoriesThe Nature StateRights of Nature RecognitionDiseases and Pests in HistoryTerms of DisasterHistories across SpeciesTechnology and ExpertiseCoastal HistoryReligion and Place, and Notions and Nature.Contact Information: To submit, simply send a filled-out version of the sumission form, which you can find on our website here, together with your draft submission to Arcadia’s managing editor, Pauline Kargruber (arcadia@carsoncenter.lmu.de)—guidelines are included in the form. Your email should also include 2–5 images and/or multimedia (with permissions if necessary) and a profile photo.
https://www.environmentandsociety.org/arcadia/contribution ___________________________________ CALL FOR PANELISTS:
Settler colonialism, boarderlands, and agricultural / rural history
Aly Kreikemeier  The 2024 meeting of the Agricultural History Society will convene near the U.S.- Mexico border in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Borders have been central to global agricultural history as contested, trespassed, flaunted, celebrated, and enforced spaces. These demarcations, whether imperial, physical, cultural, or ecological, have determined the movement of laborers, crops, livestock, insects, and knowledge throughout the world. They sit at the heart of historical debates over trade, technology, migration, and settlement. We gather for the annual meeting in Las Cruces to examine how humans have interacted with boundaries and in-between spaces in agricultural history and to engage with scholarship that might inform contemporary debates around borders.https://www.aghistorysociety.org/2024-meetingScholars interested in presenting a paper or joining a roundtable addressing settler colonialism please contact Alyssa Kreikemeier (akreikemeier@unm.edu) and Perri Meldon (Perri@bu.edu) with your interest by Oct. 1.___________________________________ CALL FOR PAPERS: 
Ruins and the art of gardening
Vol. 46 of the Cahiers de Mariemont undertakes to explore the various ways in which ruins, real or fake, have been incorporated into the art of gardening.
Deadline for proposals: 15 October

In gardens, man has always sought to make nature, in its most subtle forms, coexist with the most refined artefacts. Among the latter, monumental traces of the past, the materiality of their obsolescence and destruction, and the fragile balance they represent between memory and oblivion, have always aroused interest and fascination. Once seen as a testimony to the past that should be preserved and enhanced, a collapsed or incomplete building, that can no longer fulfill its original purpose, can take on other symbolic or ornamental functions in the garden. In Mariemont, for example, the wealthy entrepreneur and philanthropist Raoul Warocqué had the remains of the palace of Charles de Lorraine (1712-1780) incorporated into the English-style landscaped park surrounding his residence in 1893, combining the romantic staging of the ruin with the enhancement of an archaeological reality. Today, there are other practices. At the Grand archaeological garden in Lorraine and the Saint-Acheul archaeological garden in the Somme department, for example, the art of gardening is used to make the archaeological fact, whether monumental or not, clearer and more accessible. The ruins are no longer just another ornament. These “archaeological gardens” are designed as natural sites planted with trees, in which the ruins are the subject.

The Cahiers de Mariemont therefore calls on historians, art historians, archaeologists, architects, town planners, botanists, gardeners and other garden design specialists to identify the common features and major developments in the practice of integrating ruins into European gardens over the centuries. The aim will also be to identify the current issues and strategies for managing and promoting this practice. More than being
specific case studies, the articles will focus on diachronic, thematic (types of archaeological fact, public, environment, climate, etc.) or territorial analysis and perspective.

Proposals for contributions, in French or English (including an abstract of 2,000 to 3,000 characters including spaces, with a provisional title, a short bibliography on the subject, and a biography of 2 or 3 lines) should be sent to Jean-Sébastien Balzat (jean-sebastien.balzat@museemariemont.be) before 15 October 2023. The text of the article as well as an abstract (French and English) and 10 key words (French and English) are expected by 15 March 2024.

___________________________________ ASEH CALL FOR PRIZE NOMINATIONSAll deadlines are November 20, 2023.PRIZESEach year, ASEH awards five prizes for outstanding scholarshipin the field of environmental history. Please read the instructions for submitting your work for consideration for each prize listed below.George Perkins Marsh Prize for best book in environmental historyAlice Hamilton Prize for best article outside journal Environmental History Leopold-Hidy Prize for best article in journal Environmental History (with Forest History Society)Rachel Carson Prize for best dissertation in environmental historyASEH-FHS Graduate Student Essay Prize
___________________________________

JOBS AND OPPORTUNITIES
____________________________________  CALL FOR JOURNAL CO-EDITORSHISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY- AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF GEOGRAPHERSMichael Wise (he/his)  Historical Geography is a peer-reviewed annual journal that publishes scholarly articles, book reviews, conference reports, and commentaries. Since 1993, the journal has encouraged an interdisciplinary dialogue among scholars, professionals, and students interested in geographic perspectives on the past. The journal is currently published by the University of Nebraska Press and distributed online through Project Muse. The journal is sponsored by the Historical Geography Specialty Group of the American Association of Geographers.The journal is currently seeking two co-editors to replace outgoing co-editor Mike Wise (University of North Texas) and John Bauer (University of Nebraska-Kearny). Working with co-editor Chris Dando (University of Nebraska-Omaha), and the journal editorial board, the new co-editors will assist with manuscript solicitation, peer review and editing, as well as journal production and management. The position is voluntary and typically held for a 5-year term.The journal is also currently seeking a new book review editor who will be responsible for actively curating a list of 20-30 book reviews per year in the field of historical geography.We are seeking to build a team with interdisciplinary reach and especially invite environmental historians whose interests engage with critical geographical scholarship to contact us. Please email a CV and a short expression of interest (including mention of any institutional support) to Mike Wise (michael.wise@unt.edu) and Mark Rhodes (marhodes@mtu.edu) by November 1, 2023. Any questions about the journal or the position may be directed to them as well. These appointments will begin in 2024, with a transition period in Spring 2024.

____________________________________ REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS:
GUNSTON HALL National Historic Landmark Update-ASALH- The Founders of Black history Month

The National Park Service (NPS) is seeking the services of a Principal Investigator (PI) or Principal  Investigator(s) through a cooperative agreement with the Association for the Study of African American Life  and History, Inc. (ASALH) to update the National Historic Landmark (NHL) nomination form for Gunston Hall  in Fairfax County, Virginia.
Gunston Hall was designated a NHL in 1960 (NRIS# 66000832) for its association with George Mason and his contributions to the nation’s founding principles, as well as for its architectural importance. The NPS is interested in updating the history and analysis included in the Gunston Hall NHL nomination to reflect a more expansive history that acknowledges the complexities of the period and the people involved. This includes adding information about the centrality of the institution of slavery in Mason’s life and accomplishments, about the people that Mason enslaved, acknowledgment of women’s roles and accomplishments, and a discussion of the complexities and contradictions of Mason and his ideas that inspired the Declaration of Independence.

National Historic Landmarks & National Register Coordinator
National Park Service
National Capital Region
NCR Website https://www.nps.gov/RESSNCR
NHL Website http://www.nps.gov/nhl____________________________________  ASEH CALL FOR FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONSAll deadlines are November 20, 2023.FELLOWSHIPSThe ASEH currently offers four research fellowships: the Hal Rothman Dissertation Fellowship, the J. Donald Hughes Graduate Research Fellowship, the Equity Graduate Student Fellowship, and the Samuel P. Hays Fellowship.The Rothman, Hughes, and Equity Fellowships are reserved for graduate students; the Hays Fellowship is open to all non-student practicing historians.In addition, the ASEH co-sponsors the ASEH–Newberry Library Fellowship for scholars who will work with the Newberry’s extensive holdings in Chicago. 
___________________________________________

CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA

___________________________________________
  GARDEN FUTURES SUMMIT 2023HOW GARDENS ARE CHANGING THE FUTURE
Hosted by the Garden Conservancy
September 29-30, 2023
More information hereThe inaugural Garden Futures Summit is a two-day, in-person event that looks to sustain the remarkable passion and interest in gardening today by presenting a selection of the most exciting ideas shaping the future of gardens and society at large. The Summit will focus on three essential topics within contemporary gardening: environment, community, and culture.On the first day of the Summit, to be held at The New York Botanical Garden, more than a dozen influential speakers from across the gardening world will participate in sessions organized around the Summit topics. They will discuss the extraordinary potential of gardens and gardening to improve our physical, cultural, and emotional health and well-being.On the second day of the Summit, attendees will be treated to exclusive experiences at both private and public gardens throughout New York City and the greater metropolitan area that embody the forward-thinking and transformative potential in gardens today. Tours will be announced later this summer.The breadth of speakers at the Summit and the combination of talks and tours will be of interest to all gardeners, designers, architects, and students who are passionate about gardens and their enormous potential in society.___________________________________________

CGLHS Annual Conference 
OCTOBER 13-15, 2023

Ukiah, CA

Join us this fall to explore a sweet and little-known corner of southeastern Mendocino County. Nestled in between forested hills covered in a mix of oak woodlands and redwood forests, the rich valley floor is called Redwood Valley. Some of the largest redwood trees in the world are just west of town in Montgomery Woods State Preserve. Presentations and tours on Saturday, October 15, will take place at the Grace Hudson Museum in downtown Ukiah, and focus on local ethnography and history. Sunday will see us head into the Redwoods for a history and ecology tour with partners from State Parks. 
__________________________________

2023 Annual Meeting of the HIstorians of Eighteenth Century Art and Architecture
HECAA@30

October 12-14, 2023
Boston, Cambridge, and Providence, USA On the land of the Massachusett and neighboring Wampanoag and Nipmuc peoples, Boston developed in the eighteenth century as a major colonized and colonizing site. Its status today as a cultural and intellectual hub is shaped by that context, making it a critical location to trace the cultural legacies of racism and social injustice between the eighteenth century and today. For whom is “eighteenth-century art and architecture” a useful category? What eighteenth-century materials, spaces, and images offer tools or concepts for shaping our collective futures? In considering these questions, the Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA) aim to be deliberate about expanding the group’s traditional focus on Western European art and architecture and specifically encourage proposals from scholars working on Asia, Africa and the African diaspora, Indigenous cultures, and the Islamic world. This conference marks our 30th year as a scholarly society dedicated to facilitating communication and collaboration among scholars of eighteenth-century art to expand and promote knowledge of all aspects of the period’s visual culture. ____________________________________ 

EAHN Thematic Conference 2023, Reykjavik: The Third Ecology.
Conference: 11-13 October 2023

For Information click here
The Third Ecology

The effects of the anthropogenic climate crisis has compelled a resurgence of scholarship about the often fraught relationship between the built and the natural environment. The connection between the building sector and the disruption on the physical systems of the planet are not merely coincidental but causal. Currently, global building activity produces nearly 40% of the world’s yearly greenhouse gas emissions, making architecture, broadly, one of the most polluting activities in human history. That a new “climatic turn” appears to be taking shape in architecture history is no surprise, but does the changing climate also require a new methodology forwriting architecture history? If historians now know that architecture is causing ecological harm, how should the field of architecture history respond? Seen through the lens of environmental justice, does the climate crisis impel architecture histories of environment to address decolonization and anti-racism?

____________________________________ 

Urban History Association (UHA)
October 26-29, 2023
Pittsburgh, PA
The conference theme is “Reparations & the Right to the City”. It not only responds to increasing global calls for restorative justice and rights to the city for all, it also aims to set and reset the role and mission of Urban History at present and into the future as an intensely interdisciplinary and transnational enterprise focusing on all aspects of metropolitan, urban, and suburban history. Join upwards of 750 urban historians, writers, scholars, policymakers, urban planners, activists and journalists participating in approximately 100 panels, plenaries, roundtables, and tours during the four-day event. The conference will take place October 26-29, 2023 in Pittsburgh, PA, where the 1st UHA conference was held in 2002. The conference will be held at The Westin Pittsburgh in the heart of the downtown business and cultural district.____________________________________ 

American Historical Association (AHA), January 4-7, 2024, San Francisco, CA
____________________________________ 

American Society for Environmental Historians (ASEH), April 3-7,2024, Denver Colorado
____________________________________ 
Organization for American Historians, April 11-14,2024, New Orleans, LA The current cascade of crises—viral, racial, economic, political, constitutional and environmental—shape and shadow our communities and our nation. History and historians have a role to play in addressing these crises; documenting, writing, amplifying, and mediating stories that can inform our moment and promote social justice.Join the community in New Orleans, Louisiana or at the Virtual Conference Series in cooperation with NCPH, in 2024 as we honor and explore the ways in which individuals, communities, and historians work and learn together.____________________________________ 
Society of Architectural Historians 2024 Annual International Conference (SAH), APRIL 17–21, 2024,  ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

Join the Society of Architectural Historians in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 17–21, 2024, for an immersive, in-person experience that includes paper sessions, events at off-site venues, and guided architecture tours in and around the city. Attendees can look forward to connecting with colleagues at social receptions, meeting publishers in the exhibit area, and conversing between sessions, all valued moments at the face-to-face conference.
____________________________________ 

Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH)October, 2024, San Diego, CA
_________________________________________ OFFICERS

President
Kathleen John-Alder
Rutgers University

Vice President
John Davis
Knowlton School, The Ohio State University

Secretary
Royce Earnest
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Newsletter Editor
Thaisa Way
Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Colleciton

Advisory Board
Finola O’Kane Crimmins
University College Dublin
(2019-2022)

Georges Farhat
University of Toronto
(2019-2022)

Mohammad Gharipour
University of Maryland
(2021-2024)

Margot Lystra
Independent Scholar
(2021-2024)

Stephen Whiteman
The Courtauld Institute of Art
(2021-2024)

Jan Woudstra
The University of Sheffield
(2021-2024)


_____________________
Take Note/ Resources;
______________________ TEACHING AND PEDAGOGYIn the September Issue of the American Historical ReviewMark Philip Bradley | Sep 18, 2023The new #AHRSyllabus project launches in the September issue of the American Historical Review, the journal’s first sustained effort at bringing teaching and pedagogy into its pages. This collaborative and collective syllabus project is designed to help teachers and students look “under the hood” at how historians currently practice history. Each edition of the syllabus will feature a practical hands-on teaching module that foregrounds innovative uses of historical method in the classroom. All modules will be freely available to encourage wide classroom adoption.

______________________

Check out the Institute of Historical Research- blog- On History: https://blog.history.ac.uk
______________________

Recent Books of Interest
_____________________ 

Here are books, and an article or two, with a historic narrative of landscape that have been published relatively recently:

Kris, E., Parshall, L. B., Felfe, R., & Tchikine, A. (2023). The rustic style. Dumbarton Oaks, Trustees for Harvard University.

Biggs, Mathew, editor, 2023. Garden: Exploring the Horticultural World, Phaedon Press.

Padua, M. G. (2023) “Illuminating a Hidden Site: the Recovery of a Sacred Black Landscape”, Landscape Journal42(1) pp 53-75 https://doi.org/10.3368/lj.42.1.53

Wain, Anthony. 2023.  “Searching for Common Ground in the Gardens of the Past | AJLA.” Issue 5, Article 5. Accessed August 19, 2023. https://www.ajlajournal.org/articles/searching-for-common-ground-in-the-gardens-of-the-past.

Bsumek, Erika Marie. 2023. The Foundations of Glen Canyon Dam: Infrastructures of Dispossession on the Colorado Plateau. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Blackhawk, N. (2023). The Rediscovery of America : Native Peoples and the Unmaking of U.S. History. Yale University Press.

Whiteman, Stephen H. 2023. Landscape and Authority in the Early Modern World. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Avila, Eric, and Thaisa Way, eds, 2023. Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture 44, Segregation and Resistance in the Landscapes of the Americas. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Goldstein, Brian 2023, new, expanded edition The Roots of Urban Renaissance: Gentrification and the Struggle Over Harlem.

Hämäläinen, Pekka. 2022. Indigenous Continent : the Epic Contest for North America. First edition. New York, NY: Liveright Publishing Corporation, a division of W.W. Norton & Company.

Duempelmann, Sonja, ed. 2022. Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture 43, Landscapes for Sport : Histories of Physical Exercise, Sport, and Health. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Ferrari, Carlyn Ena,. 2022. Do Not Separate Her from Her Garden : Anne Spencer’s Ecopoetics. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.

Way, Thaisa. ed. 2022. Garden as Art: Beatrix Farrand at Dumbarton Oaks.Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

O’Brien, William E. paperback 2022. Landscapes of Exclusion : State Parks and Jim Crow in the American South. Amherst, [Massachusetts] ; Boston, [Massachusetts]: University of Massachusetts Press, in association with Library of American Landscape History.

Rein, Richard K. 2022. American Urbanist : How William H. Whyte’s Unconventional Wisdom Reshaped Public Life. Washington, DC: Island Press.

Birnbaum, Charles A., Arleyn A. Levee, Dena Tasse-Winter, and Cultural Landscape Foundation issuing body. 2022. Experiencing Olmsted : the Enduring Legacy of Frederick Law Olmsted’s North American Landscapes. Portland, Oregon: Timber Press.

Freytag, Anette. 2021. The Landscapes of Dieter Kienast. Zurich: gta Verlag.

Padua, M. G. (2020) Hybrid Modernity: the Public Park in Late 20th Century China,Routledge https://www.routledge.com/Hybrid-Modernity-The-Public-Park-in-Late-20th-Century-China/Padua/p/book/9780367528225

Helphand, Kenneth. 2020. Hops: Historic Photographs of the Oregon Hopscape, Corvallis: Oregon State University Press, 2020. (Finalist Oregon Book Award, 2022.)




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Categories
Monthly News

SAH Chapter News August 2023

Below are the SAH regional chapter news updates received by the liaison during the month of August 2023.


Chapter News, August 2023

SAH LANDSCAPE HISTORY CHAPTER 

LANDSCAPE HISTORY CHAPTER of the Society of Architectural Historians
August 2023Extreme heat in Death Valley, California in Summer 2023.

We hope each of you is doing well, staying safe, and keeping healthy, hydrated, cool, in whatever ways you and yours need.

Please send announcements, inquiries, and any other materials you want included in our newsletter to  wayt01@do aks.org.   

Check out https://www.sahlandscape.org/. It would be awesome to expand our list of resources. If you are interested in helping us inventory resources, let me know. 

Can I encourage you to share your publications with us? It would be great to have a list of books out in the past year or so- so let me know of your publications or the new books on your shelves. 

Best, Thaisa et al…
Director | Garden & Landscape Studies | Dumbarton Oaks | Trustees for Harvard University
 ________________________________________________________________ 

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PROPOSALS

___________________________________

EAHN is pleased to announce that the Call for Papers for EAHN 2024 is now open.
Deadline: September 8, 2023
EAHN 2024 Athens Website

Abstracts are invited for the sessions and round tables listed below by September 8, 2023. Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted at eahn2024@gmail.com along with the applicant’s name, email address, professional affiliation, address, telephone number and a short curriculum vitae, all included in one single .pdf file. The file must be named as follows: session or round table number, hyphen, surname e.g. S05-Tsiambaos.pdf, RT02-Tournikiotis.pdf, etc.

____________________________________

JOBS AND OPPORTUNITIES
____________________________________ 
 Lord & Schryver Conservancy
545 Mission Street SE, Salem, OR 97302
Lord & Schryver Conservancy is looking for a Development Director
The organization is seeking the perfect individual to fill the job. Please spread the word about this new position!
 
The new Development Director will join a dedicated board, a cohort of long-term volunteers and a full-time Head Gardener to raise awareness of and increase resources to interpret Lord & Schryver’s work and legacy into the future.
 
Visit the website for the full Development Director Job Description.

____________________________________ 
 SLU in Ultuna, Division of Landscape Architecture 
division of landscape architecture 
We are looking for a new colleague, an Associate senior lecturer in landscape architecture with specialisation in arts-based research . The subject of the associate senior lecturer is arts-based research in landscape architecture that aims to understand and respond to sustainability challenges. The subject integrates artistic methods and reflexive approaches firmly rooted in the arts and humanities. 

____________________________________ 
 Dumbarton Oaks “Democracy and Landscape” Initiative
Mellon Post-doctoral fellowship in Environmental History, in the Mellon funded Democracy and Landscape Initiative at Dumbarton Oaks, a Harvard research institute, located in Washington DC

Dumbarton Oaks announces a post-doctoral fellowship position in Democracy and Landscape. Please circulate across your networks!  and as a note, the appointment will provide significant time for your own research. Please reach out if you have any questions to Thaisa Way (wayt01@doaks.org)
 
Details regarding the position are available on our website: https://www.doaks.org/about/employment/post-doctoral-fellow-in-democracy-and-landscape Review of applications will begin on August 15, 2023. Applications still accepted.
 
____________________________________  The National Park Service, National Capital Region needs historians!The National Park Service will soon be hiring a GS-11 historian with expertise in African American history to serve in a full-time, temporary (not to exceed four years) position within the Park History program, supporting parks in the greater Washington, DC area. Qualified candidates will have in-depth, up-to-date knowledge of African American history, completion of at least one long-form historical study, and experience with collaborative research projects. We are especially interested in candidates with experience conducting oral histories and working in partnership with local and descendant communities and organizations.For more information about the position, see this link.____________________________________ 

Landscape scholarships
ninth edition call, 2023/2024
Deadline: noon on Thursday 31 August 2023

 
Fondazione Benetton Studi Ricerche establishes landscape study scholarships on a yearly basis to support young graduates who wish to carry out research into the landscape and gardens culture and in the field of the care of places.
 
The scholarships focus on three thematic areas which correspond to the cultural profile and field of activity of three key figures for the Foundation’s scientific work since its inception: Sven-Ingvar Andersson (Landscape project), Rosario Assunto (Theories and policies for landscape) and Ippolito Pizzetti (Nature and gardens).
 
The ninth edition 2023/2024 will grant two six-month scholarships in one of the three thematic areas, to be chosen by the candidate. The application form and the call are available at www.fbsr.it Applications must be sent by email to paesaggio@fbsr.it
 
The deadline for submitting applications is, without exception, noon on Thursday 31 August 2023. (Assume Italian Time Zone)Information
Fondazione Benetton Studi Ricerche, Via Cornarotta 7-9, T +39 0422 5121, paesaggio@fbsr.it, www.fbsr.it
____________________________________ Call for Events and Microgrants
Environmental Humanities Month, September-December 2023
Deadline: August 21, 2023.
The Environmental Humanities Month is now inviting proposals for online and hybrid events, interventions, projects, actions to be included in the globally focused Environmental Humanities Month in the Autumn of 2023.The main goal of the Environmental Humanities Month is to raise awareness about the humanities and social sciences aspects of circularity and humanity’s shift to sustainability by targeting a global audience via scientific and artistic interdisciplinary cross-pollination, and by using local knowledge as well as languages beyond English to amplify vulnerable and marginalized voices of environmental humanities across the globe. 
Contact Email: 
helsinkienvhum@gmail.com
URL: 
https://www.helsinki.fi/en/researchgroups/environmental-humanities/news-events/call-for-events-and-microgrants-environme…Read more or reply___________________________________________

CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA

___________________________________________

Upcoming History Conferences:
___________________________________________
Association for the Study of African American Life and History 
(ASALH
September 20-24,2023
Jacksonville, FloridaNote: there will be a roundtable discussion of how historians collaborate with the NPS on Saturday morning. Check out the program.

African Americans have resisted historic and ongoing oppression, in all forms, especially the racial terrorism of lynching, racial pogroms, and police killings since our arrival upon these shores. These efforts have been to advocate for a dignified self-determined life in a just democratic society in the United States and beyond the United States political jurisdiction. During the 1950s and 1970s the United States was defined by actions such as sit-ins, boycotts, walk outs, strikes by Black people and white allies in the fight for justice against discrimination in all sectors of society from employment to education to housing. Black people have had to consistently push the United States to live up to its ideals of freedom, liberty, and justice for all. Black people also have sought ways to nurture and protect Black lives, and for autonomy of their physical and intellectual bodies through armed resistance, voluntary emigration, nonviolence, education, music, literature, sports, media, and legislation/politics.For more information about the 2023 Annual Meeting and Conference or to reserve your hotel for Jacksonville: https://asalh.org/CONFERENCE/
____________________________________ 
GARDEN FUTURES SUMMIT 2023HOW GARDENS ARE CHANGING THE FUTURE
Hosted by the Garden ConservancySeptember 29-30, 2023
More information hereThe inaugural Garden Futures Summit is a two-day, in-person event that looks to sustain the remarkable passion and interest in gardening today by presenting a selection of the most exciting ideas shaping the future of gardens and society at large. The Summit will focus on three essential topics within contemporary gardening: environment, community, and culture.On the first day of the Summit, to be held at The New York Botanical Garden, more than a dozen influential speakers from across the gardening world will participate in sessions organized around the Summit topics. They will discuss the extraordinary potential of gardens and gardening to improve our physical, cultural, and emotional health and well-being.On the second day of the Summit, attendees will be treated to exclusive experiences at both private and public gardens throughout New York City and the greater metropolitan area that embody the forward-thinking and transformative potential in gardens today. Tours will be announced later this summer.The breadth of speakers at the Summit and the combination of talks and tours will be of interest to all gardeners, designers, architects, and students who are passionate about gardens and their enormous potential in society.___________________________________________

CGLHS Annual Conference 
OCTOBER 13-15, 2023

Ukiah, CA

Join us this fall to explore a sweet and little-known corner of southeastern Mendocino County. Nestled in between forested hills covered in a mix of oak woodlands and redwood forests, the rich valley floor is called Redwood Valley. Some of the largest redwood trees in the world are just west of town in Montgomery Woods State Preserve. Presentations and tours on Saturday, October 15, will take place at the Grace Hudson Museum in downtown Ukiah, and focus on local ethnography and history. Sunday will see us head into the Redwoods for a history and ecology tour with partners from State Parks. 
__________________________________

2023 Annual Meeting of the HIstorians of Eighteenth Century Art and Architecture
HECAA@30

October 12-14, 2023
Boston, Cambridge, and Providence, USAOn the land of the Massachusett and neighboring Wampanoag and Nipmuc peoples, Boston developed in the eighteenth century as a major colonized and colonizing site. Its status today as a cultural and intellectual hub is shaped by that context, making it a critical location to trace the cultural legacies of racism and social injustice between the eighteenth century and today. For whom is “eighteenth-century art and architecture” a useful category? What eighteenth-century materials, spaces, and images offer tools or concepts for shaping our collective futures? In considering these questions, the Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA) aim to be deliberate about expanding the group’s traditional focus on Western European art and architecture and specifically encourage proposals from scholars working on Asia, Africa and the African diaspora, Indigenous cultures, and the Islamic world. This conference marks our 30th year as a scholarly society dedicated to facilitating communication and collaboration among scholars of eighteenth-century art to expand and promote knowledge of all aspects of the period’s visual culture. ____________________________________ 

EAHN Thematic Conference 2023, Reykjavik: The Third Ecology.
Conference: 11-13 October 2023

For Information click here
The Third Ecology

The effects of the anthropogenic climate crisis has compelled a resurgence of scholarship about the often fraught relationship between the built and the natural environment. The connection between the building sector and the disruption on the physical systems of the planet are not merely coincidental but causal. Currently, global building activity produces nearly 40% of the world’s yearly greenhouse gas emissions, making architecture, broadly, one of the most polluting activities in human history. That a new “climatic turn” appears to be taking shape in architecture history is no surprise, but does the changing climate also require a new methodology forwriting architecture history? If historians now know that architecture is causing ecological harm, how should the field of architecture history respond? Seen through the lens of environmental justice, does the climate crisis impel architecture histories of environment to address decolonization and anti-racism?

____________________________________ 

Urban History Association (UHA)
October 26-29, 2023
Pittsburgh, PA
The conference theme is “Reparations & the Right to the City”. It not only responds to increasing global calls for restorative justice and rights to the city for all, it also aims to set and reset the role and mission of Urban History at present and into the future as an intensely interdisciplinary and transnational enterprise focusing on all aspects of metropolitan, urban, and suburban history. Join upwards of 750 urban historians, writers, scholars, policymakers, urban planners, activists and journalists participating in approximately 100 panels, plenaries, roundtables, and tours during the four-day event. The conference will take place October 26-29, 2023 in Pittsburgh, PA, where the 1st UHA conference was held in 2002. The conference will be held at The Westin Pittsburgh in the heart of the downtown business and cultural district.____________________________________ 

American Historical Association (AHA), January 4-7, 2024, San Francisco, CA
____________________________________ 

American Society for Environmental Historians (ASEH), April 3-7,2024, Denver Colorado
____________________________________ 

Society of Architectural Historians 2024 Annual International Conference (SAH), APRIL 17–21, 2024,  ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

Join the Society of Architectural Historians in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 17–21, 2024, for an immersive, in-person experience that includes paper sessions, events at off-site venues, and guided architecture tours in and around the city. Attendees can look forward to connecting with colleagues at social receptions, meeting publishers in the exhibit area, and conversing between sessions, all valued moments at the face-to-face conference.
____________________________________ 

Organization for American Historians, April 11-14,2024, New Orleans, LAThe current cascade of crises—viral, racial, economic, political, constitutional and environmental—shape and shadow our communities and our nation. History and historians have a role to play in addressing these crises; documenting, writing, amplifying, and mediating stories that can inform our moment and promote social justice.Join the community in New Orleans, Louisiana or at the Virtual Conference Series in cooperation with NCPH, in 2024 as we honor and explore the ways in which individuals, communities, and historians work and learn together.____________________________________ 

Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH)October, 2024, San Diego, CA
_________________________________________OFFICERS

President
Kathleen John-Alder
Rutgers University

Vice President
John Davis
Knowlton School, The Ohio State University

Secretary
Royce Earnest
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Newsletter Editor
Thaisa Way
Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Colleciton

Advisory Board
Finola O’Kane Crimmins
University College Dublin
(2019-2022)

Georges Farhat
University of Toronto
(2019-2022)

Mohammad Gharipour
University of Maryland
(2021-2024)

Margot Lystra
Independent Scholar
(2021-2024)

Stephen Whiteman
The Courtauld Institute of Art
(2021-2024)

Jan Woudstra
The University of Sheffield
(2021-2024)



Recent Books of Interest

SO WHAT HAVE YOU PUBLISHED LATELY???? 
LET US KNOW. Here are some of the books, and an article or two, with a historic narrative of landscape that have been published relatively recently:

Wain, Anthony. 2023.  “Searching for Common Ground in the Gardens of the Past | AJLA.” Issue 5, Article 5. Accessed August 19, 2023. https://www.ajlajournal.org/articles/searching-for-common-ground-in-the-gardens-of-the-past.

Bsumek, Erika Marie. 2023. The Foundations of Glen Canyon Dam: Infrastructures of Dispossession on the Colorado Plateau. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Hämäläinen, Pekka. 2022. Indigenous Continent : the Epic Contest for North America. First edition. New York, NY: Liveright Publishing Corporation, a division of W.W. Norton & Company.

Whiteman, Stephen H. 2023. Landscape and Authority in the Early Modern World. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

O’Brien, William E. 2016. Landscapes of Exclusion : State Parks and Jim Crow in the American South. Amherst, [Massachusetts] ; Boston, [Massachusetts]: University of Massachusetts Press, in association with Library of American Landscape History.

Rein, Richard K. 2022. American Urbanist : How William H. Whyte’s Unconventional Wisdom Reshaped Public Life. Washington, DC: Island Press.

Birnbaum, Charles A., Arleyn A. Levee, Dena Tasse-Winter, and Cultural Landscape Foundation issuing body. 2022. Experiencing Olmsted : the Enduring Legacy of Frederick Law Olmsted’s North American Landscapes. Portland, Oregon: Timber Press.

Freytag, Anette. 2021. The Landscapes of Dieter Kienast. Zurich: gta Verlag.

Helphand, Kenneth. 2020. Hops: Historic Photographs of the Oregon Hopscape, Corvallis: Oregon State University Press, 2020. (Finalist Oregon Book Award, 2022.)

Avila, Eric, and Thaisa Way, eds, 2023. Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture 44, Segregation and Resistance in the Landscapes of the Americas. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Goldstein, Brian 2023, new, expanded edition The Roots of Urban Renaissance: Gentrification and the Struggle Over Harlem.

Duempelmann, Sonja, ed. 2022. Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture 43, Landscapes for Sport : Histories of Physical Exercise, Sport, and Health. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Ferrari, Carlyn Ena,. 2022. Do Not Separate Her from Her Garden : Anne Spencer’s Ecopoetics. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.

Way, Thaisa. ed. 2022. Garden as Art: Beatrix Farrand at Dumbarton Oaks.Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

 a wayHave something to share in the newsletter? Click HereContact us: sahlandscape@gmail.com.

Copyright ©The Landscape Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians


info@sahscc.orgLast Chance!AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Demshuk on Hitler’s CitiesZoom PresentationSunday, August 20th, 1:00 PM PSTReconstructing war ravaged cities is a topic all too top of mind. Find out how cities have approached this problem in the past. Read more…Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!Photo: Dunsmuir Apartments, Julius Shulman. © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, California.Read more


Fwd: SESAH August 2023 Newsletter



SESAH Newsletter
August 2023
Please consider giving to our Annual Campaign

ANNOUNCEMENTS!
Book hotel by Sept. 5th to get SESAH Rate!
Early Bird Registration ends August 31st!
Only 5 spots left of Saturday Study Tour!

2023 SESAH Conference Registration Now Open! 
Registration for the 2023 SESAH Conference in Little Rock, Arkansas, is now open! Join colleagues from across the Southeast for a fun conference of presentations, discussion, camaraderie, and socializing. The conference will be held September 27-30 at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Little Rock (book by Sept. 5th to get the conference rate), and will feature two days of paper presentations on Thursday and Friday along with a study tour on Saturday (only 5 spots left). This year’s keynote address will be given Friday evening by Dr. Ethel Goodstein-Murphree, Associate Dean and Professor of Architecture, University of Arkansas, and will be held at the Old State House Museum, a National Historic Landmark adjacent to the hotel. Saturday’s study tour will visit several properties in the Little Rock area that date from prehistoric times to the 1950s.
Make sure that your membership is up-to-date before registering for the conference! Renew or start your membership here or email membership@sesah.org if you’re not sure of your current status. Registration for session moderators and presenters must be completed by August 3rd. Early Bird Registration for the conference ends on August 31st (late registrations subject to $25 fee), and the final registration deadline for the conference is September 13th. For additional information on the conference and to complete your registration, please visit our website here, and we look forward to seeing you in Little Rock in September 2023!

New Mississippi and Louisiana State Representatives 
Please join us in welcoming our new state representatives for Mississippi and Louisiana for the SESAH Board of Directors. Aaron White will fulfill the unexpired term of Chris Hunter, who has moved to Texas. Mary Springer fulfill the unexpired term of Nicholas Serrano, who is moving to Florida.
Aaron White, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the School of Architecture at Mississippi State University. He holds a PhD in Architectural History and Theory from Columbia University, an MA in Architecture from Pratt Institute, and a BA in Architecture from the University of Idaho. His research focuses on relations between classicism and colonization in late-sixteenth and early-seventeenth century English architecture.
Mary R. Springer, Ph.D., is an art and architectural historian whose research evaluates the ideological relationships between design, space, and patronage in U.S. educational and civic built environments. Springer’s recent projects examine Pittsburgh’s Cathedral of Learning and town-gown relationships, Frederick Law Olmsted’s campus planning ideologies and architectural determinism, and Duke University’s colonially encoded architecture and campus. In 2022, Springer joined the Louisiana Tech University School of Design as an Assistant Professor of Art History. A multidisciplinary historian, she teaches history and theory within the School of Design’s programs of studio art, design, and architecture. She earned an M.A. in Art History from the University of Saint Thomas and a Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Iowa.


Submit to Arris! 
Call for Papers: Articles and Field Notes
Arris, the journal of the Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians, is accepting submissions for articles and field notes to be published in upcoming issues.
Articles generally run from 5,000-7,000 words and are blind peer-reviewed. They should demonstrate a rigorous mastery over the scholarly literature, research methods, field work (if applicable), and available primary sources of the subject. Articles should proceed beyond a descriptive approach to draw new conclusions or present new theoretical paradigms.
Field notes are shorter contributions, approximately 2,500 words in length, and are blind peer-reviewed. These notes discuss significant ongoing field work or other research of interest to SESAH members.
Only original work neither published previously nor under review for publication elsewhere will be considered.
There is no specific deadline for submissions, which are accepted on a rolling basis. If an article or field notes is accepted, but the issue in progress already has a sufficient number of them, it will be published in the next issue.
Submissions should follow Arris guidelines.


Member News

New Book: The Architecture of Modern American Synagogues, 1950-1960s
SESAH member Anat Geva, Ph.D., has published another new book, The Architecture of American Synagogues, 1950s-1960s. This book introduces an architectural analysis of selected modern American synagogues and reveals how they express American Jewry’s resilience in continuing their physical and spiritual identity, while embracing modernism, American values, and landscape. In addition, the book contributes to the discourse on preserving the recent past (e.g., mid 20th century architecture). While most of the investigations on that topic deal with the “brick & mortar” challenges, this book introduces preservation issues as a function of changes in demographics, in faith rituals, in building codes, and in energy conservation. The book offers a fresh perspective on an important moment in American Jewish society and culture as reflected in their houses of worship and adds to the literature on modern American  sacred architecture. Find more information here.


Does your institution subscribe to Arris???
If not, encourage them to subscribe in one of 3 ways:
Print subscription for $50 annually (1 issue) through UNC Press’s subscription fulfillment partners at Duke University Press. Contact: 
Email subscriptions@dukeupress.edu 
Phone toll-free in the US and Canada (888) 651-0122 
Phone (919) 688-5134 
Digital subscriptions for $50 to Arris’s full catalog are available through ProjectMUSE. Arris is on their Hosted platform, so they will need to get a single title subscription through ProjectMUSE. 
For both print and digital subscriptions for $60/year, reach out to Duke University Press at the contact info above.



READ MORE ON OUR WEBSITE 


Fwd: How to rebuilt after war? Demshuk on Hitler’s Cities



AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Demshuk on Hitler’s CitiesZoom PresentationSunday, August 20th, 1:00 PM PSTReconstructing war ravaged cities is a topic all too top of mind. Find out how cities have approached this problem in the past. Read more…Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!Photo: Dunsmuir Apartments, Julius Shulman. © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, California.Read more Connect with u      
SAHSCC | Box 491952, Los Angeles, CA 90049Unsubscribe slisgirl@gmail.comUpdate Profile | Constant Contact Data NoticeSent by info@sahscc.org powered byTry email marketing for free today!


NCCSAH Fall 2023 San Diego Tour




We have a few places left for our exciting Fall, 2023 Tour of SAN DIEGO Architecture. The cut off date for the group rate at the La Pensione Hotel is August 22.


MODERN & HISTORIC ARCHITECTURE OF SAN DIEGO
OCTOBER 17-19, 2023
 
The NCCSAH has organized a very exciting and unique tour for the Fall, 2023: the wonderfully varied historic and modern architecture of San Diego. The tour itinerary is attached. The tour includes historic treasures like Balboa Park (a National Historic Landmark Historic District) and the 19th century Gaslamp Quarter in addition to iconic modern landmarks like Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute and many significant buildings by the architect Irving Gill in La Jolla. More information about the tour will be included in the Fall, 2023 NCCSAH Newsletter.
 
We would like to express our deepest gratitude to architectural historian Diane Kane (vitae attached), our tour organizer and guide, for the many hours she had devoted to organizing this fantastic tour of San Diego!
Registration
Tour cost:
$ 250 members ($280 non-members includes $30 annual membership dues) for three days of tours (includes charter bus and tour fees, three course dinner at elegant El Prado restaurant in Balboa Park; lunch at the Fiesta de Reyes in Old Town; and lunch at the University of California, San Diego Faculty Club).
We have reserved a block of rooms at the group rate of $ 189 per day for a standard queen room at the Le Pensione Hotel (660 West Date Street) https://www. lapensionehotel.com. A limited number of double queen rooms are available for $229 per day. Room rates will also be honored for attendees one day before the October 17 arrival date and one day after the departure date (October 19). Tour attendees can call the hotel direct at 619-236-8000 and reference “Society of Architectural Historians” in order to receive the discounted group rate. The cut off date for this rate is August 22, 2023.
The Le Pensione Hotel is in the center of San Diego’s Little Italy neighborhood (https://www.littleitalysd.com). There are dozens of restaurants and cafes within walking distance from the hotel. The hotel also is only about 2 miles from the San Diego airport and it is near a San Diego trolley stop.
Send your check made out to “NCCSAH” to Ward Hill, 3124 Octavia Street #102, San Francisco, CA 94123.  Please include your name, email (very important!), and telephone number. No cancellations after September 17, 2023 unless we can sell your position.
Transportation
Tour transportation will include a Charter Bus and San Diego’s excellent and very extensive trolley system.
https://www.govisitsandiego.com/getting-around/public-transportation/san-diego-trolley/

Categories
Monthly News

SAH Chapter News July 2023

Below are the SAH regional chapter news updates received by the liaison during the month of July 2023.

Subject: July 2023 SESAH Newsletter

SESAH Newsletter

July 2023

Please consider giving to our Annual Campaign

2023 SESAH Conference Registration Now Open! 

Registration for the 2023 SESAH Conference in Little Rock, Arkansas, is now open! Join colleagues from across the Southeast for a fun conference of presentations, discussion, camaraderie, and socializing. The conference will be held September 27-30 at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Little Rock, and will feature two days of paper presentations on Thursday and Friday along with a study tour on Saturday. This year’s keynote address will be given Friday evening by Dr. Ethel Goodstein-Murphree, Associate Dean and Professor of Architecture, University of Arkansas, and will be held at the Old State House Museum, a National Historic Landmark adjacent to the hotel. Saturday’s study tour will visit several properties in the Little Rock area that date from prehistoric times to the 1950s.

Make sure that your membership is up-to-date before registering for the conference! Renew or start your membership here or email membership@sesah.org if you’re not sure of your current status. Registration for session moderators and presenters must be completed by August 3rd. Early Bird Registration for the conference ends on August 31st, and the final registration deadline for the conference is September 13th. For additional information on the conference and to complete your registration, please visit our website here, and we look forward to seeing you in Little Rock in September 2023!

New Mississippi and Louisiana State Reps. 

Please join us in welcoming our new state representatives for Mississippi and Louisiana for the SESAH Board of Directors. Aaron White will fulfill the unexpired term of Chris Hunter, who has moved to Texas. Mary Springer fulfill the unexpired term of Nicholas Serrano, who is moving to Florida.

Aaron White, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the School of Architecture at Mississippi State University. He holds a PhD in Architectural History and Theory from Columbia University, an MA in Architecture from Pratt Institute, and a BA in Architecture from the University of Idaho. His research focuses on relations between classicism and colonization in late-sixteenth and early-seventeenth century English architecture.

Mary R. Springer, Ph.D., is an art and architectural historian whose research evaluates the ideological relationships between design, space, and patronage in U.S. educational and civic built environments. Springer’s recent projects examine Pittsburgh’s Cathedral of Learning and town-gown relationships, Frederick Law Olmsted’s campus planning ideologies and architectural determinism, and Duke University’s colonially encoded architecture and campus. In 2022, Springer joined the Louisiana Tech University School of Design as an Assistant Professor of Art History. A multidisciplinary historian, she teaches history and theory within the School of Design’s programs of studio art, design, and architecture. She earned an M.A. in Art History from the University of Saint Thomas and a Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Iowa.

Submit to Arris! 

Call for Papers: Articles and Field Notes

Arris, the journal of the Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians, is accepting submissions for articles and field notes to be published in upcoming issues.

Articles generally run from 5,000-7,000 words and are blind peer-reviewed. They should demonstrate a rigorous mastery over the scholarly literature, research methods, field work (if applicable), and available primary sources of the subject. Articles should proceed beyond a descriptive approach to draw new conclusions or present new theoretical paradigms.

Field notes are shorter contributions, approximately 2,500 words in length, and are blind peer-reviewed. These notes discuss significant ongoing field work or other research of interest to SESAH members.

Only original work neither published previously nor under review for publication elsewhere will be considered.

There is no specific deadline for submissions, which are accepted on a rolling basis. If an article or field notes is accepted, but the issue in progress already has a sufficient number of them, it will be published in the next issue.

Submissions should follow Arris guidelines.

Member News

New Book: Water and Sacred Architecture

SESAH member Anat Geva, Ph.D., published a new book, Water and Sacred Architecture. This edited book examines architectural representations that tie water, as a physical and symbolic property, with the sacred. The discussion centers on two levels of this relationship: how water influenced the sacredness of buildings across history and different religions; and how sacred architecture expressed the spiritual meaning of water. Find more information here.

Congratulations Claudette!

Claudette Stager received a Preservation Leadership Award, the 5th bestowed in 48 years, for her 37 years of service with the Tennessee Historical Commission and State Historic Preservation Office, as a National Register Coordinator then the Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer. Please join us in congratulating Claudette!

Does your institution subscribe to Arris???

If not, encourage them to subscribe in one of 3 ways:

  1. Print subscription for $50 annually (1 issue) through UNC Press’s subscription fulfillment partners at Duke University Press. Contact:
    1. Email subscriptions@dukeupress.edu 
    2. Phone toll-free in the US and Canada (888) 651-0122 
    3. Phone (919) 688-5134 
  2. Digital subscriptions for $50 to Arris’s full catalog are available through ProjectMUSE. Arris is on their Hosted platform, so they will need to get a single title subscription through ProjectMUSE. 
  3. For both print and digital subscriptions for $60/year, reach out to Duke University Press at the contact info above.

Subject: From Chicago Chapter of SAH—-An event that might interest you



https://glencoepubliclibrary.evanced.info/signup/eventdetails?eventid=12769&lib=0

Subject: From Chicago Chapter of SAH: Honoring Sally Chappell



Sally Anderson Kitt Chappell

27 June 1929 – 2 Aug 2021

Honoring and Celebrating 

Dear Friends, Admirers and Colleagues of Sally,

Please join us to honor Sally on Sunday, August 13, 2023, from 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm in the afternoon in the Garden Court and Hospitality Rooms at 3750 North DuSable Lake Shore Drive.

The building requires that guests must register in advance to attend. NO reservation = NO entry.

Details are below

If you wish, there will be an opportunity to read a SHORT – 2-4 minutes – passage from one of her publications and/or a SHORT – 2-4 minutes – memory of what Sally meant to you.

We all enjoyed Sally’s hospitality, so of course there will be light refreshments.

Parking is limited. Please use public transportation if at all possible. Several bus routes, including 135, 146,147, 151, stop right in front of the building or across the street. Refer to the CTA for details. If you drive, there is limited street parking, and surface parking across DLSD in the park. The Cubs will be out of town, but remember it’s a summer day.

Please email Elaine & Kevin Harrington at harrington@iit.edu to reserve your place for this event to celebrate Sally’s life and work, no later than Monday, July 31, 2023. 

Thank You,

Elaine & Kevin Harrington 

on behalf of Paula Duffy, Susanna Epp, John Jahrling, Stephanie Quinn, Eileen Soderstrom, and Don Whitfield

PLEASE SHARE this message 

Subject: SESAH Conference Registration Now Open!



2023 SESAH CONFERENCE REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

2023 SESAH CONFERENCE REGISTRATION OPEN

Registration for the 2023 SESAH Conference in Little Rock, Arkansas, is now open! Join colleagues from across the Southeast for a fun conference of presentations, discussion, camaraderie, and socializing. The conference will be held September 27-30 at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Little Rock, and will feature two days of paper presentations on Thursday and Friday along with a study tour on Saturday. This year’s keynote address will be given Friday evening by Dr. Ethel Goodstein-Murphree, Associate Dean and Professor of Architecture, University of Arkansas, and will be held at the Old State House Museum, a National Historic Landmark adjacent to the hotel. Saturday’s study tour will visit several properties in the Little Rock area that date from prehistoric times to the 1950s.

Registration for session moderators and presenters must be completed by August 3rd. Early Bird Registration for the conference ends on August 31st, and the final registration deadline for the conference is September 13th. For additional information on the conference and to complete your registration, please visit our website here.

LANDSCAPE HISTORY CHAPTERof the Society of Architectural Historians
Fort Negley was the topic of an excellent piece by Kofi Boone in the most recent Landscape Architecture Magazine- check it out here.

We are  growing at https://www.sahlandscape.org/.  As always, please send announcements, inquiries, and any other materials you want included in our newsletter- you can send to  wayt01@doaks.org.  

Society of Architectural Historians 2024 Annual International Conference (SAH), APRIL 17–21, 2024,  ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

Join the Society of Architectural Historians in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 17–21, 2024. And consider nominating a new board member: The SAH Nominating Committee seeks nominations and self-nominations for five new SAH Board members. They will begin their term at the conclusion of the Albuquerque annual conference in 2024. Board members will serve a three-year term April 2024 – April 2027 renewable for a second three-year term, for a maximum of six years. Nominations due July 31, 2023.

Consider subscribing to the European Architecture History Network to learn more about the broader fields and opportunities; https://eahn.org/

And finally don’t miss the announcements at the bottom of the list:)  Dumbarton Oaks has announced a new Postdoctoral Fellowship in Environmental History, see below or hereThe National Park Service, National Capital Region needs historians- see below…

Best, Thaisa et al…
Director | Garden & Landscape Studies | Dumbarton Oaks | Trustees for Harvard University
 ________________________________________________________________________ 

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PROPOSALS

____________________________________ASEH 2024 Annual ConferenceThe Westin Denver DowntownApril 3-7, 2024The CALL FOR PROPOSALS for ASEH 2024 is now open!ASEH 2024 will feature research on all facets of environmental history, from any geographical or temporal context, especially related to the conference theme, Changing Climates: Environmental Histories of Extractivism and Speculation. The Program Committee welcomes traditional panels, individual papers, teaching and pedagogy sessions, innovative formats, and sessions that encourage active audience participation. Click the button below to view the entire Call for Proposals and to submit panels, roundtables, alternative sessions, posters, and individual papers. The deadline for submissions is July 15, 2023.____________________________________

ASEH 2024 Panel on the Imagined Jungle
by Brian Leech;I’m putting together a panel on jungles/rainforests in popular culture for the April 2024 American Society for Environmental History annual conference in Denver. Kelly Enright (Flagler College) plans to talk about how some portrayals build support for conservation. I’m talking about how other portrayals build support for mining. Our question: does popular culture encourage protection, extraction, or both?Anyone interested in joining us? Just send an email to brianleech@augustana.edu.____________________________________

EAHN is pleased to announce that the Call for Papers for EAHN 2024 is now open.
Deadline: September 8, 2023
EAHN 2024 Athens Website

Abstracts are invited for the sessions and round tables listed below by September 8, 2023. Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted at eahn2024@gmail.com along with the applicant’s name, email address, professional affiliation, address, telephone number and a short curriculum vitae, all included in one single .pdf file. The file must be named as follows: session or round table number, hyphen, surname e.g. S05-Tsiambaos.pdf, RT02-Tournikiotis.pdf, etc.
 
____________________________________

2023 HALS Challenge: Working Landscapes
Deadline: July 31, 2023

For the 14th annual HALS Challenge competition, the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) invites you to document Working Landscapes. Historic “working” or “productive” landscapes may be agricultural or industrial and unique or traditional. Some topical working landscapes convey water for irrigation or provide flood control. Please focus your HALS report on the landscape as a whole and not on a building or structure alone. For this theme, the HAER History Guidelines may be helpful along with HALS History Guidelines.
 Deadline to submit short format histories: July 31, 2023
Awards presented: October 27-30, 2023, during the ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture in Minneapolis
____________________________________

JOBS AND OPPORTUNITIES
____________________________________ 

Mellon Post-doctoral fellowship in Environmental History, in the Mellon funded Democracy and Landscape Initiative at Dumbarton Oaks, a Harvard research institute, located in Washington DC

Dumbarton Oaks announces a post-doctoral fellowship position in Democracy and Landscape. Please circulate across your networks!  and as a note, the appointment will provide significant time for your own research. Please reach out if you have any questions to Thaisa Way (wayt01@doaks.org)
 
Details regarding the position are available on our website: https://www.doaks.org/about/employment/post-doctoral-fellow-in-democracy-and-landscape Review of applications will begin on August 15, 2023. 
 
____________________________________  The National Park Service, National Capital Region needs historians!The National Park Service will soon be hiring a GS-11 historian with expertise in African American history to serve in a full-time, temporary (not to exceed four years) position within the Park History program, supporting parks in the greater Washington, DC area. Qualified candidates will have in-depth, up-to-date knowledge of African American history, completion of at least one long-form historical study, and experience with collaborative research projects. We are especially interested in candidates with experience conducting oral histories and working in partnership with local and descendant communities and organizations.For more information about the position, see this link.____________________________________ 

Landscape scholarships
ninth edition call, 2023/2024
The deadline for submitting applications
is noon on Thursday 31 August 2023

 
Fondazione Benetton Studi Ricerche establishes landscape study scholarships on a yearly basis to support young graduates who wish to carry out research into the landscape and gardens culture and in the field of the care of places.
 
The scholarships focus on three thematic areas which correspond to the cultural profile and field of activity of three key figures for the Foundation’s scientific work since its inception: Sven-Ingvar Andersson (Landscape project), Rosario Assunto (Theories and policies for landscape) and Ippolito Pizzetti (Nature and gardens).
 
The ninth edition 2023/2024 will grant two six-month scholarships in one of the three thematic areas, to be chosen by the candidate. Candidate are encouraged to submit entries with original and innovative contents which reflect the scientific direction of the Foundation and are able to explore and enhance themes belonging to its recent history.
 
The value of each scholarship is Euro 10,000.00 (gross).
The duration of the scholarships, which are residential and non-extendable, is six months and they will take place from 15 January 2024 to 15 July 2024.
 
The scholarships are open to Italian and foreign graduates (master’s degree/laurea magistrale) and postgraduates who are under the age of 40 on 31 August 2023.
Research grant holders, or those who hold a public or private position and carry out any work activity on an ongoing basis cannot apply. A good working knowledge of written and spoken Italian is required.
 
The application form and the call are available at www.fbsr.it
Applications must be sent by email to paesaggio@fbsr.it
 
The deadline for submitting applications is, without exception, noon on Thursday 31 August 2023.Information
Fondazione Benetton Studi Ricerche, Via Cornarotta 7-9, T +39 0422 5121, paesaggio@fbsr.it, www.fbsr.it
____________________________________ Call for Events and MicrograntsEnvironmental Humanities Month, September-December 2023Deadline: 21.8.2023 (Monday)The Environmental Humanities Month is now inviting proposals for online and hybrid events, interventions, projects, actions to be included in the globally focused Environmental Humanities Month in the Autumn of 2023.The main goal of the Environmental Humanities Month is to raise awareness about the humanities and social sciences aspects of circularity and humanity’s shift to sustainability by targeting a global audience via scientific and artistic interdisciplinary cross-pollination, and by using local knowledge as well as languages beyond English to amplify vulnerable and marginalized voices of environmental humanities across the globe. 
Contact Email: 
helsinkienvhum@gmail.com
URL: 
https://www.helsinki.fi/en/researchgroups/environmental-humanities/news-events/call-for-events-and-microgrants-environme…Read more or reply___________________________________________

CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA

___________________________________________

Upcoming History Conferences:
___________________________________________


Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) September 20-24,2023, Jacksonville, FloridaNote: there will be a roundtable discussion of how historians collaborate with the NPS- stay tuned. 

African Americans have resisted historic and ongoing oppression, in all forms, especially the racial terrorism of lynching, racial pogroms, and police killings since our arrival upon these shores. These efforts have been to advocate for a dignified self-determined life in a just democratic society in the United States and beyond the United States political jurisdiction. During the 1950s and 1970s the United States was defined by actions such as sit-ins, boycotts, walk outs, strikes by Black people and white allies in the fight for justice against discrimination in all sectors of society from employment to education to housing. Black people have had to consistently push the United States to live up to its ideals of freedom, liberty, and justice for all. Black people also have sought ways to nurture and protect Black lives, and for autonomy of their physical and intellectual bodies through armed resistance, voluntary emigration, nonviolence, education, music, literature, sports, media, and legislation/politics.

Black-led institutions and affiliations have lobbied, litigated, legislated, protested, and achieved success. In an effort to live, maintain, and protect economic success Black people have organized/planned violent insurrections against those who enslaved them, or choose to self-liberate as seen by the actions those who left the plantation system. Black people established faith institutions to organize resistance efforts; and it was a space that inspired folk to participate in the movements and offered sanctuary during times of crisis.

This is a call to everyone, inside and outside the academy, to study the history of Black Americans’ responses to establish safe spaces, where Black life can be sustained, fortified, and respected.For more information about the 2023 Annual Meeting and Conference or to reserve your hotel for Jacksonville: https://asalh.org/CONFERENCE/
____________________________________ 

CGLHS Annual Conference 
OCTOBER 13-15, 2023

Ukiah, CA

Join us this fall to explore a sweet and little-known corner of southeastern Mendocino County. Nestled in between forested hills covered in a mix of oak woodlands and redwood forests, the rich valley floor is called Redwood Valley. Some of the largest redwood trees in the world are just west of town in Montgomery Woods State Preserve. Presentations and tours on Saturday, October 15, will take place at the Grace Hudson Museum in downtown Ukiah, and focus on local ethnography and history. Sunday will see us head into the Redwoods for a history and ecology tour with partners from State Parks. 
__________________________________

2023 Annual Meeting of the HIstorians of Eighteenth Century Art and Architecture
HECAA@30

October 12-14, 2023
Boston, Cambridge, and Providence, USAOn the land of the Massachusett and neighboring Wampanoag and Nipmuc peoples, Boston developed in the eighteenth century as a major colonized and colonizing site. Its status today as a cultural and intellectual hub is shaped by that context, making it a critical location to trace the cultural legacies of racism and social injustice between the eighteenth century and today. For whom is “eighteenth-century art and architecture” a useful category? What eighteenth-century materials, spaces, and images offer tools or concepts for shaping our collective futures? In considering these questions, the Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA) aim to be deliberate about expanding the group’s traditional focus on Western European art and architecture and specifically encourage proposals from scholars working on Asia, Africa and the African diaspora, Indigenous cultures, and the Islamic world. This conference marks our 30th year as a scholarly society dedicated to facilitating communication and collaboration among scholars of eighteenth-century art to expand and promote knowledge of all aspects of the period’s visual culture. ____________________________________ 

EAHN Thematic Conference 2023, Reykjavik: The Third Ecology.
Conference: 11-13 October 2023

For Information click here
The Third Ecology

The effects of the anthropogenic climate crisis has compelled a resurgence of scholarship about the often fraught relationship between the built and the natural environment. The connection between the building sector and the disruption on the physical systems of the planet are not merely coincidental but causal. Currently, global building activity produces nearly 40% of the world’s yearly greenhouse gas emissions, making architecture, broadly, one of the most polluting activities in human history. That a new “climatic turn” appears to be taking shape in architecture history is no surprise, but does the changing climate also require a new methodology forwriting architecture history? If historians now know that architecture is causing ecological harm, how should the field of architecture history respond? Seen through the lens of environmental justice, does the climate crisis impel architecture histories of environment to address decolonization and anti-racism?

____________________________________ 

Urban History Association (UHA)
October 26-29, 2023
Pittsburgh, PA
The conference theme is “Reparations & the Right to the City”. It not only responds to increasing global calls for restorative justice and rights to the city for all, it also aims to set and reset the role and mission of Urban History at present and into the future as an intensely interdisciplinary and transnational enterprise focusing on all aspects of metropolitan, urban, and suburban history. Join upwards of 750 urban historians, writers, scholars, policymakers, urban planners, activists and journalists participating in approximately 100 panels, plenaries, roundtables, and tours during the four-day event. The conference will take place October 26-29, 2023 in Pittsburgh, PA, where the 1st UHA conference was held in 2002. The conference will be held at The Westin Pittsburgh in the heart of the downtown business and cultural district.____________________________________ 

American Historical Association (AHA), January 4-7, 2024, San Francisco, CA
____________________________________ 

American Society for Environmental Historians (ASEH), April 3-7,2024, Denver Colorado
____________________________________ 

Society of Architectural Historians 2024 Annual International Conference (SAH), APRIL 17–21, 2024,  ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

Join the Society of Architectural Historians in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 17–21, 2024, for an immersive, in-person experience that includes paper sessions, events at off-site venues, and guided architecture tours in and around the city. Attendees can look forward to connecting with colleagues at social receptions, meeting publishers in the exhibit area, and conversing between sessions, all valued moments at the face-to-face conference.
____________________________________ 

Organization for American Historians, April 11-14,2024, New Orleans, LAThe current cascade of crises—viral, racial, economic, political, constitutional and environmental—shape and shadow our communities and our nation. History and historians have a role to play in addressing these crises; documenting, writing, amplifying, and mediating stories that can inform our moment and promote social justice.Join the community in New Orleans, Louisiana or at the Virtual Conference Series in cooperation with NCPH, in 2024 as we honor and explore the ways in which individuals, communities, and historians work and learn together.____________________________________ 

Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH)October, 2024, San Diego, CA
_________________________________________

SCHOLARSHIP OF INTEREST

____________________________________ 
 Gunther on Bsumek, ‘The Foundations of Glen Canyon Dam: Infrastructures of Dispossession on the Colorado Plateau’ [review]by H-Net ReviewsErika Marie Bsumek. The Foundations of Glen Canyon Dam: Infrastructures of Dispossession on the Colorado Plateau. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2023. Illustrations. 336 pp. $45.00 (e-book), ISBN 978-1-4773-2659-6; $45.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-4773-0381-8.Reviewed by Michael Gunther (Georgia Gwinnett College) Published on H-Environment (June, 2023) Commissioned by Daniella McCahey (Texas Tech University) Printable Version: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=58600____________________________________ 

Subject: LAST CHANCE! Authors on Architecture: Fontenot on Ain



Last Chance!AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Fontenot on AinZoom PresentationSunday, July 9th, 1:00 PM PSTExplore the work of Modern master, Gregory Ain with the author of the new book Notes From Another Los Angeles: Gregory Ain and the Construction of a Social Landscape (MIT Press, 2022). Read more…Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!Photo: Dunsmuir Apartments, Julius Shulman. © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, California

MODERN & HISTORIC ARCHITECTURE OF SAN DIEGO

OCTOBER 17-19, 2023

The NCCSAH has organized a very exciting and unique tour for the Fall, 2023: the wonderfully varied historic and modern architecture of San Diego. The tour itinerary is attached. The tour includes historic treasures like Balboa Park (a National Historic Landmark Historic District) and the 19th century Gaslamp Quarter in addition to iconic modern landmarks like Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute and many significant buildings by the architect Irving Gill in La Jolla. More information about the tour will be included in the Fall, 2023 NCCSAH Newsletter.

We would like to express our deepest gratitude to architectural historian Diane Kane (vitae attached), our tour organizer and guide, for the many hours she had devoted to organizing this fantastic tour of San Diego!

Registration

Tour cost:

$ 250 members ($280 non-members includes $30 annual membership dues) for three days of tours (includes charter bus and tour fees, three course dinner at elegant El Prado restaurant in Balboa Park; lunch at the Fiesta de Reyes in Old Town; and lunch at the University of California, San Diego Faculty Club).

We have reserved a block of rooms at the group rate of $ 189 per day for a standard queen room at the Le Pensione Hotel (660 West Date Street) https://www. lapensionehotel.com. A limited number of double queen rooms are available for $229 per day. Room rates will also be honored for attendees one day before the October 17 arrival date and one day after the departure date (October 19). Tour attendees can call the hotel direct at 619-236-8000 and reference “Society of Architectural Historians” in order to receive the discounted group rate. The cut off date for this rate is August 22, 2023.

The Le Pensione Hotel is in the center of San Diego’s Little Italy neighborhood (https://www.littleitalysd.com). There are dozens of restaurants and cafes within walking distance from the hotel. The hotel also is only about 2 miles from the San Diego airport and it is near a San Diego trolley stop.

Send your check made out to “NCCSAH” to Ward Hill, 3124 Octavia Street #102, San Francisco, CA 94123.  Please include your name, email (very important!), and telephone number. No cancellations after September 17, 2023 unless we can sell your position.

Transportation

Tour transportation will include a Charter Bus and San Diego’s excellent and very extensive trolley system.

https://www.govisitsandiego.com/getting-around/public-transportation/san-diego-trolley/

Categories
Monthly News

SAH Chapter News June 2023

Below are the SAH regional chapter news updates received by the liaison during the month of June 2023.


Subject: New Program! Authors on Architecture



AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Fontenot on AinZoom PresentationSunday, July 9th, 1:00 PM PSTExplore the work of Modern master, Gregory Ain with the author of the new book Notes From Another Los Angeles: Gregory Ain and the Construction of a Social Landscape (MIT Press, 2022). Read more…Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!Photo: Dunsmuir Apartments, Julius Shulman. © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, California.Read moreConnect with u ‌ ‌ ‌

Subject: Last Chance for Sunday Zoom Program!



AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Keylon on KapturZoom PresentationSunday, June 25th, 1:00 PM PSTTake an air conditioned trip to visit the work of Palm Springs Modernist master, Hugh Kaptur in this special Zoom program with author Steven Keylon. Read more…Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!.Read moreConnect with u ‌ ‌ ‌
SAHSCC
Subject: Palm Springs Modern! Keylon on Kaptur via Zoom
AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Keylon on KapturZoom PresentationSunday, June 25th, 1:00 PM PSTTake an air conditioned trip to visit the work of Palm Springs Modernist master, Hugh Kaptur in this special Zoom program with author Steven Keylon. Read more…Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!

Subject: Special Event from Chicago Chapter of SAH

Thursday, July 27

10:30 am

Driehaus Museum, 40 East Erie Street, Chicago

Meet at the front door of the Driehaus Museum.

We have a special opportunity to tour the Hector Guimard exhibit before the museum opens. 

Hector Guimard is best-known for his designs for the Paris Métro, which are so emblematic of the French Art Nouveau style that it was sometimes referred to as “le style Métro.” Representing a radical break from the classical and revival styles of the nineteenth century, Art Nouveau embraced natural forms while integrating architecture with the decorative and fine arts. Hector Guimard: Art Nouveau to Modernism explores Guimard’s commitment to sharing beautiful, sensuous, accessible designs for both civic architecture and everyday objects with a wide audience, as well as Guimard’s modern entrepreneurial approach to promoting his work through Le Style Guimard branding and his use of mass-production technologies. The show also explores the critical role played by his wife and collaborator Adeline Oppenheim Guimard, presenting new scholarship that underscores her critical role as her husband’s creative partner during his lifetime and ardent steward of his legacy.

The cost of the tour is $20. Please make your check out to Chicago Chapter of SAH and send to Judy Freeman, 3500 North Lake Shore Drive, #11A, Chicago, IL  60657 The deadline for reservations is July 13. If you have any questions, please respond to this email.

Subject: Last Chance for The Brutalists



AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Hopkins on the BrutalistsZoom PresentationSunday, June 11th, 1:00 PM PSTBrutalism is one of architectural history’s most misunderstood movements. Join author Owen Hopkins as he discusses his book, The Brutalists: Brutalism’s Best Architects (Phaidon, 2023). Read more…Have a conflict for Sunday? Buy a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!Photo: Boston City Hall (1969, Kallmann, McKinnell & Knowles).Read moreConnect with u ‌ ‌ ‌
SAHSCCBox 491952Los Angeles, CA 90049Unsubscribe slisgirl@gmail.comUpdate Profile | Constant Contact Data NoticeSent by info@sahscc.orgpowered byTry email marketing for free today!
Subject: LAST CHANCE! The Driving Force AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Holter and Gee on The Driving ForceZoom PresentationSunday, June 4th, 1:00 PM PSTAuthor Stephen Gee and his co-author Darryl Holter for Driving Force: Automobiles and the New American City, 1900-1930 (Angel City Press, 2023), a look at Los Angeles’ impact on the early automobile industry.Have a conflict for Sunday? But a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…

Subject: Lummis House Tour and Members’ Celebration!



LUMMIS HOUSE TOUR and RECEPTIONSaturday, June 10th, 2023, 4-6PMIt has been a few years, but it is time to say thank you to our members and meet new friends with a tour of the Charles F. Lummis Residence in the Arroyo Seco. We will also be honoring recently retired Board Member, Merry Ovnick for her decades of service.Members may attend this event for free, non-members pay just $10 for an afternoon of history, food, fun and fellowship.Read more/Reserve a space/Buy a ticket…Photo: Los Angeles Department of Parks and Recreation.Read moreConnect with u ‌ ‌ ‌

Categories
Monthly News

SAH Chapter News April-May 2023

Below are the SAH regional chapter news updates received by the liaison during the months of April and May 2023.

LANDSCAPE HISTORY CHAPTERof the Society of Architectural Historians
With the SAH 2024 meeting in New Mexico, here is an image I took in 2022 at Bandalier National Monument, New Mexico

I am delighted to share that with collective work in action we have our website up and ready to be updated with your events, activities, books, and such… check it out at https://www.sahlandscape.org/. And send us landscape history images we might use to diversify the collection. 

SAH’s 2023 meeting was productive, generative, and enjoyed by many. Thank you to all who attended and contributed. And welcome to the new and remaining officers of our own chapter.

As always, please send announcements, inquiries, and any other materials you want included in our newsletter- you can send to  wayt01@doaks.org.

Best, Thaisa et al…
Director | Garden & Landscape Studies | Dumbarton Oaks | Trustees for Harvard University
 ANNOUNCEMENTS
CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA
____________________________________ 
Upcoming History Conferences:

Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) September 20-24,2023, Jacksonville, FloridaAfrican Americans have resisted historic and ongoing oppression, in all forms, especially the racial terrorism of lynching, racial pogroms, and police killings since our arrival upon these shores. These efforts have been to advocate for a dignified self-determined life in a just democratic society in the United States and beyond the United States political jurisdiction. During the 1950s and 1970s the United States was defined by actions such as sit-ins, boycotts, walk outs, strikes by Black people and white allies in the fight for justice against discrimination in all sectors of society from employment to education to housing. Black people have had to consistently push the United States to live up to its ideals of freedom, liberty, and justice for all. Black people also have sought ways to nurture and protect Black lives, and for autonomy of their physical and intellectual bodies through armed resistance, voluntary emigration, nonviolence, education, music, literature, sports, media, and legislation/politics.

Black-led institutions and affiliations have lobbied, litigated, legislated, protested, and achieved success. In an effort to live, maintain, and protect economic success Black people have organized/planned violent insurrections against those who enslaved them, or choose to self-liberate as seen by the actions those who left the plantation system. Black people established faith institutions to organize resistance efforts; and it was a space that inspired folk to participate in the movements and offered sanctuary during times of crisis.

This is a call to everyone, inside and outside the academy, to study the history of Black Americans’ responses to establish safe spaces, where Black life can be sustained, fortified, and respected.For more information about the 2023 Annual Meeting and Conference or to reserve your hotel for Jacksonville: https://asalh.org/CONFERENCE/
____________________________________ 

CGLHS Annual Conference 
OCTOBER 13-15, 2023
Ukiah, CA

Join us this fall to explore a sweet and little-known corner of southeastern Mendocino County. Nestled in between forested hills covered in a mix of oak woodlands and redwood forests, the rich valley floor is called Redwood Valley. Some of the largest redwood trees in the world are just west of town in Montgomery Woods State Preserve. Presentations and tours on Saturday, October 15, will take place at the Grace Hudson Museum in downtown Ukiah, and focus on local ethnography and history. Sunday will see us head into the Redwoods for a history and ecology tour with partners from State Parks. 
__________________________________

2023 Annual Meeting of the HIstorians of Eighteenth Century Art and Architecture
HECAA@30
October 12-14, 2023
Boston, Cambridge, and Providence, USAOn the land of the Massachusett and neighboring Wampanoag and Nipmuc peoples, Boston developed in the eighteenth century as a major colonized and colonizing site. Its status today as a cultural and intellectual hub is shaped by that context, making it a critical location to trace the cultural legacies of racism and social injustice between the eighteenth century and today. For whom is “eighteenth-century art and architecture” a useful category? What eighteenth-century materials, spaces, and images offer tools or concepts for shaping our collective futures? In considering these questions, the Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA) aim to be deliberate about expanding the group’s traditional focus on Western European art and architecture and specifically encourage proposals from scholars working on Asia, Africa and the African diaspora, Indigenous cultures, and the Islamic world. This conference marks our 30th year as a scholarly society dedicated to facilitating communication and collaboration among scholars of eighteenth-century art to expand and promote knowledge of all aspects of the period’s visual culture. ____________________________________ 

EAHN Thematic Conference 2023, Reykjavik: The Third Ecology.
Conference: 11-13 October 2023
For Information click here
The Third Ecology

The effects of the anthropogenic climate crisis has compelled a resurgence of scholarship about the often fraught relationship between the built and the natural environment. The connection between the building sector and the disruption on the physical systems of the planet are not merely coincidental but causal. Currently, global building activity produces nearly 40% of the world’s yearly greenhouse gas emissions, making architecture, broadly, one of the most polluting activities in human history. That a new “climatic turn” appears to be taking shape in architecture history is no surprise, but does the changing climate also require a new methodology forwriting architecture history? If historians now know that architecture is causing ecological harm, how should the field of architecture history respond? Seen through the lens of environmental justice, does the climate crisis impel architecture histories of environment to address decolonization and anti-racism?

____________________________________ 

Urban History Association (UHA), October 26-29, 2023, Pittsburgh, PAThe conference theme is “Reparations & the Right to the City”. It not only responds to increasing global calls for restorative justice and rights to the city for all, it also aims to set and reset the role and mission of Urban History at present and into the future as an intensely interdisciplinary and transnational enterprise focusing on all aspects of metropolitan, urban, and suburban history. Join upwards of 750 urban historians, writers, scholars, policymakers, urban planners, activists and journalists participating in approximately 100 panels, plenaries, roundtables, and tours during the four-day event. The conference will take place October 26-29, 2023 in Pittsburgh, PA, where the 1st UHA conference was held in 2002. The conference will be held at The Westin Pittsburgh in the heart of the downtown business and cultural district.____________________________________ 

American Historical Association (AHA), January 4-7, 2024, San Francisco, CA
____________________________________ 

American Society for Environmental Historians (ASEH), April 3-7,2024, Denver Colorado
____________________________________ 

Society of Architectural Historians 2024 Annual International Conference (SAH), APRIL 17–21, 2024,  ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

Join the Society of Architectural Historians in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 17–21, 2024, for an immersive, in-person experience that includes paper sessions, events at off-site venues, and guided architecture tours in and around the city. Attendees can look forward to connecting with colleagues at social receptions, meeting publishers in the exhibit area, and conversing between sessions, all valued moments at the face-to-face conference.

____________________________________ 

Organization for American Historians, April 11-14,2024, New Orleans, LAThe current cascade of crises—viral, racial, economic, political, constitutional and environmental—shape and shadow our communities and our nation. History and historians have a role to play in addressing these crises; documenting, writing, amplifying, and mediating stories that can inform our moment and promote social justice.Join us in New Orleans, Louisiana or at the Virtual Conference Series in cooperation with NCPH, in 2024 as we honor and explore the ways in which individuals, communities, and historians work and learn together.____________________________________ 
Call for Nominations: SAHARA Associate Editor The Society of Architectural Historians seeks an associate editor for SAHARA, its digital archive of images of the global built environment. This is a volunteer position. SAHARA has been growing and evolving since 2010 and is unique in its model of member-contributed images and metadata. It currently has over 200,000 images in its Members Collection. This is an exciting time for the project as it migrates from the Artstor platform to JSTOR, where images will be available alongside articles and other print materials. SAHARA currently has two co-editors; in a new structure, the associate editor will serve alongside the two co-editors for 6–12 months, then step into the role of co-editor. At that time, a new associate editor will be recruited to ensure the overlap of incoming and outgoing editors and to provide adequate training. Deadline extended: Submit a nomination by June 8 at 5 pm CDT on June 8Learn More & Apply

Reply-To: info@sahscc.org



AUTHORS ON ARCHITECTURE:Holter and Gee on The Driving ForceZoom PresentationSunday, June 4th, 1:00 PM PSTAuthor Stephen Gee and his co-author Darryl Holter for Driving Force: Automobiles and the New American City, 1900-1930 (Angel City Press, 2023), a look at Los Angeles’ impact on the early automobile industry.Have a conflict for Sunday? But a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!Photo: Ralph Hamlin Dealership. Courtesy of Stephen Gee..

Reply-To: info@sahscc.org



Thank you, SAH/SCC Members!LUMMIS HOUSE TOUR and RECEPTIONSaturday, June 10th, 2023, 4-6PMIt has been a few years, but it is time to say thank you to our members and meet new friends with a tour of the Charles F. Lummis Residence in the Arroyo Seco. Members may attend this event for free, non-members pay just $10 for an afternoon of history, food, fun and fellowship.Read more/Reserve a space/Buy a ticket…Photo: Los Angeles Department of Parks and Recreation.Read more

Subject: From Chicago Chapter of SAH



“Chicago Harbor Lighthouse–Past, Present and Future”

Wednesday, May 24, 2023

Cliff Dwellers Club, 200 South Michigan Avenue, 22nd Floor

5:00 Cash Bar

5:30 pm Dinner optional (call 312.922.8080 for reservations)

6:30 Program

Speakers; Kurt Lentsch & Edward Torrez

In celebration of Architectural Histories’ 10th anniversary, we are pleased to invite you to a special online panel organized around the discussion of editorial politics and Open Access as ways for scholarly publications to perform as agents of activism.

This activity is 100% online, free and open to scholarly audiences from different fields, backgrounds, and geographies. We particularly encourage emergent scholars to participate and pose their questions on Open Access and editorial activism.

Tuesday May 9th
10:00am ET time / 15:00 UK time / 16:00 CET time

Registration link:
https://ucd-ie.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_YQaM84U0QxmCNcWN1fNHFQ

Special guests:
Dr. Stephen Parnell – Newcastle University, joint Editor-in-Chief of the ARENA Journal of Architectural Research.
Dr. Allison Levy – Director for Brown University Digital Publications.
Dr. Rafico Ruiz – Associate Director of Research at the Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal.

Correspondent:
MArch. Nokubekezela Mchunu – Junior Fellow at Architectural Histories. PhD student University College Dublin.

Hosts:
Prof. Samantha L. Martin – Editor-in-Chief Architectural Histories. University College Dublin.
Dr. Manuel Saga Sánchez García – Associate Editor Architectural Histories. Dumbarton Oaks.

Kind regards.

Architectural Histories – Journal of the EAHN
Samantha L. Martin | Editor-in-Chief
Manuel ‘Saga’ Sánchez García | Associate Editor

Subject: Reminder from Chicago Chapter of SAH: Lecture on May 10th

Wednesday, May 10, 2023: 

Lecture by Emily Talen, entitled “The Scale of Urbanism”. Scale is an essential factor in urbanism, but there is no common understanding of what scale is or how it should be measured. Using historical Sanborn maps, Talen investigates scale change over time, focusing on a selection of 31 Chicago sites that are now “mega-developments” but were originally composed of small-scale buildings and blocks. The historical urban fabric had five times as many buildings, and a much higher percentage of buildings with mixed use. She quantifies the degree to which small scale urbanism is associated with higher pedestrian quality. Emily Talen is Professor of Urbanism at the University of Chicago, where she teaches urban design and directs the Urbanism Lab. She holds a PhD in urban geography from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is a Fellow of the American Institute of Certified Planners, and the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship. Talen has written extensively on the topics of urban design, New Urbanism, and social equity. Please join us! Where: For both events, Cliff Dwellers, 200 S. Michigan Avenue, 22nd Floor, Chicago Illinois. Time: Cash bar opens at 4:30 pm; dinner available at 5:15 pm; all slide lectures start at 6:15 pm, free of charge.For optional dinner reservations and to reserve a spot, please call the club at 312-922-8080.  

Subject: Last Chance! Transforming the Irvine Ranch
Reply-To: info@sahscc.org



LAST CHANCE FOR SUNDAY!Transforming the Irvine RanchZoom ProgramSunday, April 30th, 1:00 PM PSTLearn how the Mid-Century master planned community of Irvine, California came about. With the vision of some of Southern California’s pioneers and architect William Pereira, FAIA (1909-1985) a whole new community, anchored by a university, rose from the ranch lands.Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!
For those attending SAH this month- please note:

April 13, 2023
1:30pm – 2:30pm
Landscape History Chapter Annual Meeting
Montreal 6 Room
 
April 13, 2023
6:30pm
Landscape History Chapter Social Hour
Le Cathcart Biergarten
https://goo.gl/maps/a3jnXEYSziURUqba9
https://www.lecathcart.com/biergarten/
Subject: NESAH Reminder: Student Symposium 4/8
Reply-To: “President, NESAH” <>NESAH Student Symposium       Next Weekend!Hello Amanda,Our 44th Annual Student Symposium is only one week away! The hybrid event will take place on Saturday, April 8; we will meet in person at Yale University and virtually on Zoom.Please see the conference poster below or visit our website for the program and more details.To register to attend the symposium, please click the button below.For any questions about the symposium, please email nesah.symposium2023@gmail.com.We hope to see you there!The NESAH BoardRegister for the Student Symposium
Categories
Monthly News

SAH Chapter News March 2023

Below are the SAH regional chapter news updates received by the liaison during the month of February 2023.

Subject: THIS SUNDAY! Jean Welz Revisited

THIS SUNDAY!The Assassination of Jean Welz, Part 2Zoom Panel PresentationSunday, March 5th, 1:00 PM PSTPeter Wyeth, author of The Lost Architecture of Jean Welz (DoppelHouse, 2022), shares new information on this important modern architect. The book, The Lost Architecture of Jean Welz (DoppelHouse, 2022) was named one of the best art books of 2022 on Hyperallergic in December of last year.Have a conflict for Sunday? But a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!Photo: Courtesy of Peter Wyeth..Read moreConnect with u ‌ ‌ ‌
SAHSCCBox 491952Los Angeles, CA 90049

Managing Water in Your Future
Understanding the Past to Develop the Future: Why a New Water Awareness  is Urgent for New York

Carola Hein, Professor and Head of History of Architecture and Urban Planning at Delft University of Technology

Tuesday March 21, 6:30 pm
New York University Department of Art History, Urban Design and Architecture Studies
Silver Center, Room 301 and on zoom 
100 Washington Square East (entrance on Waverly Place)
https://events.nyu.edu/event/315314-1

https://nyu.zoom.us/j/6362243344

At a time of climate change, sea level rise, flooding, drought, and changing groundwater and rainwater patterns, water managers need to adjust their current practices and develop new approaches. This lecture examines the role that architectural  historians and architects can play in connecting  the past, present and future of water management,  and how to help identify transformative actions.

Carola Hein is Professor and Head of History of Architecture and Urban Planning at Delft University of Technology and Professor at Leiden University and Erasmus University Rotterdam, where she initiated Leiden-Delft-Erasmus PortCityFutures programme. Since early 2022 she holds the Unesco Chair on ‘Water, Ports and Historic Cities’. Professor Hein has published widely in the field of architectural, urban and planning history, tying historical analysis to contemporary development. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship to pursue research on The Global Architecture of Oil and an Alexander von Humboldt fellowship to investigate urban transformation in Hamburg in international context. Book publications include The Capital of Europe. Architecture and Urban Planning for the European Union (Praeger, 2004); Port Cities: Dynamic Landscapes and Global Networks London (Routledge 2011); Cities, Autonomy and Decentralization in Japan (Routledge, 2006/2009, with Jeffrey Diefendorf, and Yorifusa Ishida, eds.); and Rebuilding Urban Japan after 1945 (Pallgrave Macmillan, 2003), among others. 

Event flyer available at this link:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Lp6vNAOTIfWlGC4AoS_GYlquyHMPMBV7/view?usp=sharing

Sponsored by the NYU Department of Art History, Urban Design and Architecture Studies and the Society of Architectural Historians, New York Metropolitan Chapter

Free and open to the public


Subject: From Chicago Chapter of SAH: Out and About Wright:  Portland & the Willamette Valley

Out and About Wright:Portland & the Willamette ValleyMay 5-7, 2023
The Conservancy’s spring tour program celebrates the natural beauty and organic architecture of Portland, Oregon, and the Willamette Valley. Tours include the Gordon House — Wright’s only work in the state — and designs by Taliesin apprentice Allen Lape “Davy” Davison, modernist Pietro Belluschi, contemporary organic architect Robert Oshatz & more!To learn more and register:  https://savewright.org/out-and-about-wright-portland-the-willamette-valley/

LANDSCAPE HISTORY CHAPTER of the Society of Architectural HistoriansChapter News | MID MARCH 2023Image is from  Palazzo Massimo  in Rome and the Gardens of Livia, c 39BCE- my inspiration for this week…gardens are so important to our place in the world

Happy March:

While I imagine this will be a monthly newsletter, some times there are too many upcoming notices to ignore for a whole month, so here goes for a periodic mid-month update. Note there are opportunities for graduate students below- so share with colleagues and community.  And for those announcements that remain relevant, I have shortened in this second iteration….this newsletter is a work in progress. On that same note, we will begin to revamp the website for this great chapter this month- so stay tuned…

I write you from my lovely studio at the American Academy in Rome where I have the honor and privilege of thinking about our field of landscape history and imagining where it might go. Currently there is so much important scholarship, teaching, and practice taking place expanding and enriching our understanding of land, landscape, and place. Thank you to all who are working so hard- please share with us your newest work… we will do our best to share with our broader community. 

As always, please send announcements, inquiries, and any other materials you want included in our newsletter- you can send to  wayt01@doaks.org.

Best, Thaisa et al…
Director | Garden & Landscape Studies | Dumbarton Oaks | Trustees for Harvard University
 Announcements: 
CALL FOR PAPERS IFLA 75: Histories and networks, a shift in perspectivehttps://www.ifla2023.com/ifla-75-histories-and-networks-guidelines/
Deadline for abstracts : 1st April 2023 at 12.00 hours (GMT)
Established in Jesus College in Cambridge in 1948, the International Federation of Landscape Architects remains a crucial network for knowledge transfer, progress and professionalisation of landscape architecture and has, throughout its existence, dealt with the prevailing challenges to our built environment. On the occasion of its 75th anniversary it is crucial to uncover, understand and discuss the impact it has had. Being an international, professional organization that could work and interact beyond borders, IFLA also played a crucial role in developing ideas and sharing experiences among countries from different socio-political regimes, therefore creating a platform for collaborations on key environmental issues such as ecology, conservation, stewardship of resources or the social use of open spaces. IFLA conferences and publications presented unique opportunities for knowledge transfer and exchange of strategies. As Colvin Crowe and Jellicoe put it, it was also a ‘power for peace’. While acknowledging the commitment of individuals, it has been their collective effort and various collaborations that have shaped IFLA and gave the Federation its significance and importance. Starting from an international, historiographical point of view, this session invites papers to discuss questions including (but not limited to) the following areas:What can we learn about the development of landscape architecture from the understanding and studying of professional networks like IFLA?How did IFLA’s networks operate and how did they expand to become truly global?How can we reposition the role of Europe in the development of landscape architecture profession globally by exploring IFLA’s history?What can we learn through post-colonial readings of IFLA’s history and development? How did colonial networks influence its development?From its establishment, the Federation was particularly open to women, and therefore did play an important role in female professionalization in landscape architecture. What can we learn about the history of the Federation if we interrogate its history from the point of view of gender?https://www.ifla2023.com/ifla-75-histories-and-networks-guidelines/TREE STORIES: TREES & THE MAKING AND UNMAKING OF PLACE
Co-organised by Christina Hourigan (Royal Holloway) and Caroline Cornish (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew) at the Royal Geographical Society Annual Conference, London
August 29 to September 1 2023. 
Abstract due:  March 23, 2023
This session seeks to showcase the wealth of geo-historical research around trees and their stories, and how trees have shaped and continue to shape place by their biological presence, their agency, and diverse human understandings of their values. Trees, woods, and forests are the subject of an expanding field of interdisciplinary research seeking to understand the relationships between people and the natural world from historical, cultural and geographical perspectives. …If you are interested in presenting a paper at this session please send a 250-word abstract (with name, affiliation, and contact details) to Christina Hourigan (Christina.Hourigan.2020@live.rhul.ac.uk) and Caroline Cornish (C.Cornish@kew.org) by Friday, 17 March 2023. We will inform applicants of selected papers by Friday, 23 March 2023.  

“Communicating Architecture. From the  origins of modernity to the digital age”. 
https://www.granadacongresos.com/callforpapers
Deadline: March 24th, 2023.The Architectural History Department at Universidad de Granada (Spain)  announces the call for contributions of the IV International Conference Cultura y Ciudad, which will take place in Granada from January 24 to 26, 2024. The theme for this edition is: “Communicating Architecture. From the origins of modernity to the digital age”.  Contributions are welcome from researchers affiliated to universities, research institutions, and independent researchers. At this stage, proponents are invited to send abstracts directly related to one of the four thematic blocks, written either in Spanish or English, with a maximum length of 500 words. All abstracts will be subjected to peer review. Authors of selected submissions will be contacted by the organizing committee and invited to submit a full conference paper. Full papers will be presented in person during the conference and included in the Proceedings volume. All registered participants will receive a printed copy of the Proceedings at the registration desk.
CALL FOR PROPOSALSRace in Design History: An Anthology
Deadline: March 15, 2023

edited by Kristina Wilson, Professor of Art History, Clark University and Michelle Joan Wilkinson, Curator of Architecture and Design, National Museum of African American History and CultureWe invite contributions on decorative objects, interiors, fashion, architecture, and graphic design, among others, 1800 to the present, global in scope. For further details click here. To submit a proposal, send a 300-word proposal to KrWilson@clarku.edu and WilkinsonM@si.edu with “Race in Design History” in the subject line by the deadline of March 15, 2023. Contributors will be notified by mid-April, and drafts will be due September 15, 2023.2023 HALS Challenge: Working Landscapes
Deadline: July 31, 2023
For the 14th annual HALS Challenge competition, the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) invites you to document Working Landscapes. Historic “working” or “productive” landscapes may be agricultural or industrial and unique or traditional. Some topical working landscapes convey water for irrigation or provide flood control. Please focus your HALS report on the landscape as a whole and not on a building or structure alone. For this theme, the HAER History Guidelines may be helpful along with HALS History Guidelines.
 Deadline to submit short format histories: July 31, 2023
Awards presented: October 27-30, 2023, during the ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture in Minneapolis

LSU Press series Reading the American Landscape:
William Douglas  (<wdougl1@lsu.edu>) is pleased to accept proposals for the LSU Press series Reading the American Landscape: https://lsupress.org/books/by-series/reading-the-american-landscape/sort-by/date-asc/  

SYMPOSIAASEH Annual Conference, March 22-26, 2023
Hilton Boston Back Bay, Boston, Massachusetts
Register for ASEH 2023
 Environmental Histories of the Black Atlantic World:
Landscape Histories of the African Diaspora

May 12 & 13, 2023
Dumbarton Oaks Garden and Landscape Studies Symposium in partnership with the Mellon Initiative in Democracy and Landscape Studies, Washington, DC  Registration will open in March 2023.

Symposiarchs: N. D. B. Connolly (Johns Hopkins University) and Oscar de la Torre (University of North Carolina at Charlotte)  For the last decades, scholars have interrogated the flow of goods, people, ideas, and forms of non-human life that constitute what we call the Atlantic World. Key to the field is the study of the “Black Atlantic,” an understanding of cultural and political connectedness that foregrounds the experiences of African-descended peoples, decenters Europe, and locates in place and time the multiplicity of Black cultures. Dumbarton Oaks recognizes the richness of the Black Atlantic as an idea and a place. Through a symposium on the landscape histories of the African diaspora, we aim to convene scholars, curators, and other cultural custodians conversant in Black Atlantic histories and committed to reshaping entire fields of study and practice from the Black experience outward.

Note for Students:The Bliss Symposium AwardsAvailable to currently enrolled undergraduate and graduate students, for registration and attendance to the Garden and Landscape Symposium “Environmental Histories of the Black Atlantic World: Landscape Histories of the African Diaspora,” scheduled for May 12 and 13, 2023 in Washington, DC. Successful applicants will receive reimbursement up to $600 (up to $1,200 for students traveling from abroad) for the cost of air or train travel to Washington DC, local accommodation, and other approved expenses related to symposium attendance. Dumbarton Oaks waives the symposium registration fee for Bliss Award recipients. Applications must be submitted by March 15, 2023.
 Jobs and Opportunities“Landscape Histories and Historiography Graduate Student Workshop”
May 21 to June 9, 2023
Deadline for applications: March 15, 2023
“Landscape Histories and Historiography” is an intensive three-week workshop for PhD and MLA candidates and recent MLA graduates, intended to develop the field of garden and landscape studies across disciplines and to promote the depth and breadth of future scholarship in landscape and place-based histories. Applications, completed online, are due March 15, 2023.

This year we are collaborating with the Center for Cultural Landscapes at the University of Virginia and Morven Sustainability Lab. We will spend the first two weeks at Dumbarton Oaks exploring the library and collections, reading canonic narratives, followed by counter narratives and critiques through the lens of race, gender, class, and identity. In the final week we will go to Charlottesville, VA to engage in place-based learning on the land with walking investigations of the UVa historic campus, Monticello, Montpelier, and Morven Farms. Learning from Dr. Andrea Roberts, Elizabeth Meyer, and many more, this intensive three-week workshop is designed for up to ten PhD and MLA candidates and recent MLA graduates and scheduled for May 22–June 9, 2023. All travel and lodging expenses are covered- so encourage students to join in this learning adventure.The Montpelier Foundation has begun their search for a President and Chief Executive Officer, https://www.montpelier.org/about/office-of-the-president. The Montpelier Foundation has hired the search firm Heidrick & Struggles to lead the President and CEO search. Interested candidates should write to: MontpelierFoundationCEO@heidrick.com /. Montpelier Foundation CEO Position Specification “
 

 We are delighted to note that the slate of nominees was approved by the membership. Congratulations to our new officers and thank you to all of our officers.  

OFFICERS

President
Kathleen John-Alder
Rutgers University

Vice President
John Davis
Knowlton School, The Ohio State University

Secretary
Royce Earnest
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Newsletter Editor
Thaisa Way
Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Colleciton

Advisory Board
Finola O’Kane Crimmins
University College Dublin
(2019-2022)

Georges Farhat
University of Toronto
(2019-2022)

Mohammad Gharipour
University of Maryland
(2021-2024)

Margot Lystra
Independent Scholar
(2021-2024)

Stephen Whiteman
The Courtauld Institute of Art
(2021-2024)

Jan Woudstra
The University of Sheffield
(2021-2024)



Recent Books of Interest

SO WHAT HAVE YOU PUBLISHED LATELY- LET US KNOW

Avila, Eric, and Thaisa Way, eds, Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture 44, Segregation and Resistance in the Landscapes of the Americas, https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780884024965Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Goldstein, Brian 2023, new, expanded edition The Roots of Urban Renaissance: Gentrification and the Struggle Over Harlem.

Duempelmann, Sonja, ed. 2022. umbarton Oaks Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture 43, Landscapes for Sport : Histories of Physical Exercise, Sport, and Health. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Ferrari, Carlyn Ena,. 2022. Do Not Separate Her from Her Garden : Anne Spencer’s Ecopoetics. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.

Tchikine, Anatole, Francesco Ignazio Lazzari, Taylor Ellis Johnson, and Pierre de la Ruffinière Du Prey. 2021. Francesco Ignazio Lazzari’s Discrizione Della Villa Pliniana : Visions of Antiquity in the Landscape of Umbria. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Way, Thaisa. ed. 2022. Garden as Art: Beatrix Farrand at Dumbarton Oaks.Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Zeller, Thomas. 2022. Consuming Landscapes : What We See When We Drive and Why It Matters. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press.

 Have something to share in the newsletter? Click HereImage: Bomarzo, photo by Anatole Tchikine.Contact us: sahlandscape@gmail.com.

Copyright ©The Landscape Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians
landscape history chapter · Box 355734, UW · Seattle, WA 98195 · USA

Subject: From Chicago Chapter of SAH

An Earth Day Celebration

Saturday, April 22, 2023

Houses of Tomorrow: Toward Sustainable Design Today

Michigan City and Beverly Shores, Indiana

Advanced registration for both events is required.  Click here:  Toward Sustainability — House Painter Media

Toward Sustainability — House Painter Media

The day will include historical and contemporary explorations of sustainable homes and communities.

Rare guided tours of the House of Tomorrow, designed for the 1933 Chicago Century of Progress International Exposition by George Fred Keck, will also be featured.

The programs are sponsored by Indiana Landmarks and the Indiana Humanities Council.


Subject: NESAH NESAH Student Symposium + Events of Interest

NESAH Student Symposium & Events of InterestHi Amanda,The New England Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians (NESAH) is pleased to share information on our 44th Annual Student Symposium, which will be a hybrid conference taking place on April 8, 2023. Attendees can choose to join in person at Yale University or on Zoom.Please see the conference poster below or visit our website for the program and more details.To register to attend the symposium, please click the button below.For any questions about the symposium, please email nesah.symposium2023@gmail.com.All the best,The NESAH BoardRegister for the Student SymposiumVAF 2023 Annual MeetingPlymouth, MAMay 17-20, 2023The Vernacular Architecture Forum is holding their 2023 Annual Meeting on May 17-20, 2023, in Plymouth, MA. The conference will be headquartered in the Hotel 1620 Plymouth Harbor, 180 Water Street, with a variety of tours to different sites in the region. Registration is open now!Visit the VAF website for more information.DOCOMOMO US National Symposium in New HavenComplexities of the Modern American CityJune 21-25, 2023Registration is now open for the 2023 Docomomo US National Symposium! Docomomo invites attendees to New Haven, CT, to experience one of the country’s most densely woven collections of mid-century art, design, and architecture. The symposium will consider the triumphs and complexities surrounding the design and building of the Modern city and the impacts on our collective communities.Visit the Docomomo website for more information.

Categories
Monthly News

SAH Chapter News February 2023

Below are the SAH regional chapter news updates received by the liaison during the month of February 2023.

Subject: Grace Hill, The Roundhouse & Housing Justice

Chestnut Hill Conservancy presents
THE STORIES OF GRACE HILL
A virtual lecture Thursday Feb. 23 at, 7:00 PM
$10 Members / $20 Non-Members
Registration Required at
https://chconservancy.app.neoncrm.com/np/clients/chconservancy/eventRegistration.jsp?event=26&&secureIdCustomer=1&

Join us Thursday evening for a fascinating image-filled lecture about the history of Grace Hill (8410 Prospect Avenue) and the people who created it and called it home – deeply researched and presented by its current owner Dr. Joseph Pizzano.

Dr. Pizzano’s interest in Grace Hill began with the original blueprints and other archival information gifted to him by Ned Wood, a prior owner, and grew from there over the decades. Grace Hill was built for publisher and railroad manager Cephas Childs in 1855, a year before the Chestnut Hill Railroad began operations. It was subsequently named Grace Hill and substantially altered by the Patterson and Woods families with plans by several notable architects. These prominent families were directly involved in the thoughtful evolution of Chestnut Hill from a summer retreat to a residential community – an evolution that directly affected this home. The property was subdivided in 1975, with Grace Hill remaining a single family home and its outbuildings converted to also be single family homes.
***************************************************
Design Advocacy Group presents
FRAMING THE FUTURE OF THE ROUNDHOUSE
Thursday, March 9 at 10:00 AM
Free, please register here for the Zoom link
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-future-of-the-roundhouse-tickets-524023687957

Join DAG, Andy Toy, Paul Steinke, and Ian Litwi for this important discussion

The former Police Administration Building at 7th and Race Streets, known colloquially as The Roundhouse, was conceived in the late 1950s during the progressive administration of Mayor Richardson Dilworth. The city engaged internationally-recognized Philadelphia firm GBQC Architects to design a building that would serve as an icon of modern, democratic, and transparent policing. It is a quintessential example of Philadelphia School modernism, and among the first buildings in the United States to expertly utilize the form and function of precast concrete. Completed in 1962, The Roundhouse soon entered a dark phase due to associations with destructive urban renewal programs and brutal, racist policing. That said, the Roundhouse can and should be repurposed. It is an immense 125,000 sq. ft., multi-floor structure. It is comprised of almost 90% precast concrete, structurally sound, and only sixty years old. To demolish this building would represent a waste of multiple kinds: a waste of durable building materials and their embodied energy; a wasted opportunity to leverage publicly-controlled assets toward better preservation outcomes; a wasted opportunity to model how modernist, buildings can be repurposed and successfully incorporated into larger contemporary projects; and a wasted opportunity to wrestle with and reclaim the building’s unintended legacy as a symbol of police oppression.
***************************************************
PennDesign presents
HOUSING JUSTICE FUTURES.
PHILADELPHIA FORUM ON DESIGN, RACE, AND CLIMATE CHANGE
Thursday, March 16 and Friday, March 17, 2023
For more information and registration:
https://www.design.upenn.edu/events/housing-justice-futures

HOUSING JUSTICE FUTURES will consider housing design and policy at the intersection of racial equity and climate change. As the frequency and intensity of climate-related disasters continues to rise, the provision of safe and resilient housing remains a critical need. At the same time, black, indigenous, and other households of color shoulder disproportionate impacts of climate change while facing systemic disparities in disaster relief assistance. Engaging researchers, and practitioners, and community stakeholders, we will examine the historical inequities that precipitated the housing crisis in Philadelphia and other US cities while considering actionable strategies for housing justice in the future.
****************************************************
Enjoy!
Mary Anne

Subject: NESAH Reminder: 2023 Directors’ Night / Annual Meeting on 2/27









REMINDER: Just five more days until our 2023 Directors’ Night / Annual Meeting. 
Don’t forget to register in advance!


EVENT DETAILS:


2023 Directors’ Night / Annual Meeting
Monday, February 27
7:00pm
A brief business meeting will precede the presentation of papers.
Presented via Zoom; Pre-registration required.
Dennis DeWitt

Brookline’s Mount Vernon Portico Houses

Three tall columned houses in Brookline’s Green Hill neighborhood, dating from 1794 to 1806, have been identified with the label “Jamaica Planter.”  Two are associated with well known later occupants — architect Henry Hobson Richardson and Boston Grand Dame, Isabella Stewart Gardner. Exploring the  genesis of “Jamaica Planter” revealed only a casually generated term that offered a convenient explanation for some unusual houses.  However, it did not comport with the first of these houses, Senator George Cabot’s “Old Green Hill.”  Its inspiration may have been George Washington’s Mount Vernon portico.

Dennis De Witt holds Masters degrees in architecture from Harvard and the University of Pennsylvania. He is a Past-President of S.A.H./New England, a former Vice-Chair of the Brookline Preservation Commission, a Director and Past-President of Boston’s Metropolitan Waterworks Museum, and a Commissioner of the Massachusetts Historical Commission. He has been involved with historic preservation for over 50 years. His book-length publications include Modern Architecture in Europe: A Guide to Buildings Since the Industrial Revolution and various studies related to Boston’s 19th century water system, its architects and technology.



Diana Martinez

The Olmsteds and the Imperial Prospect

In March of 1901 the U.S. Secretary of War wrote to the Olmsted firm requesting advice on improvements to Manila. Though Olmsted Jr. declined the job, he deeply influenced Daniel Burnham’s eventual plans. This paper will consider the legibility of U.S. Empire insofar as it is expressed in Olmsted’s work and influence.   
Diana Martinez is an assistant professor of architectural history and the director of architectural studies at Tufts University. She is completing a book manuscript, Concrete Colonialism: Architecture, Infrastructure, Urbanism and the American Colonial Project in the Philippines.



Robert Cowherd

Doing History in the Anthropocene

Teaching history to undergraduates as they inherit the multiple intertwined crises of the 21st century compels a critical reexamination of what we teach and how. Facing a torrent of information, how do they construct a dependable foundation for collective action? The challenge is to replace conventional teaching and learning mindsets to mobilize a more confident generation of history practitioners. Instead of studying history, college students can get a jump on a lifetime of doing history
.
Robert Cowherd, PhD, is a Professor at Wentworth Institute of Technology. His research and publications focus on the history and theory of architecture and urbanism in Southeast Asia and Latin America. He is the author most recently of “Batavian Apartheid: Mapping Bodies, Constructing Identities” in Southeast of Now
 and “Decolonizing Bamboo” in Dialectic IX
. He is former President of the New England Society of Architectural Historians.

SESAH February 2023 Newsletter



SESAH Newsletter

February 2023

Photo Courtesy of Little Rock Convention & Visitors Bureau

SESAH 2023 Annual Conference CFP

The Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians (SESAH) is now accepting proposals for papers or sessions to be presented at the 2023 SESAH Conference to be held in Little Rock, Arkansas, from September 27-30. The paper sessions will be held on Thursday and Friday, September 28 and 29. Please submit paper and/or session proposals via email at papers@sesah.org  by May 4, 2023. Find more information here.

Please join SESAH for the 2023 annual conference, which will be held in Little Rock, Arkansas, Wednesday through Saturday, September 27-30, 2023. The conference hotel is the DoubleTree, which is located in the heart of downtown Little Rock near the River Market District and approximately one mile from the Clinton Presidential Center.

The Board of Directors meeting will be held on Wednesday. Thursday and Friday will comprise the paper sessions, opening reception as well as the keynote address.  The conference’s keynote address will be held at the Old State House Museum, a National Historic Landmark that is adjacent to the DoubleTree Hotel. The study tour will be held on Saturday and will feature properties in Little Rock and its environs dating from prehistoric times to the mid-twentieth century.

Please keep checking the website for more details as they become available, and we look forward to seeing you in Little Rock in September 2023!

SESAH Conference Travel Grants

SESAH offers grants for travel to its annual conference for students and emerging professionals with the Student Conference Travel Grant and Emerging Professionals Conference Travel Grant. These grants support the recipient’s presentation of a scholarly paper at the conference as well as full attendance in conference activities: paper sessions, business meeting/awards ceremony, and keynote address. The award is $1,000 for travel, which may be used for transportation, food, lodging, and/or other expenses related to attending the conference. In addition to the monetary award, the grant provides a waived conference registration fee (study tour excluded). 

Find out more information here.

Publication Awards 2023 Call for Nominations

The SESAH Publication Awards honor outstanding scholarship on the architecture of the South, or by authors who reside in the South at the time of publication. Four categories of publication are recognized: Best Book, Best Journal Article, Best Essay in an Edited Volume, and Best Guidebook for Architecture in the Southeast.

Criteria for consideration include the publication’s contribution to scholarship, as measured by the potential impact on the field through the author(s) methodological approach and analysis; breadth of research and resources; and quality of production, particularly in the illustrations and photographs selected. All entries should be well-written, and each should be an original and thorough piece of scholarship. The copyright for entries should be no earlier than 2021.

The deadline for nominations is March 31, 2023, find more information here. Winners will be contacted via email and then officially recognized at the 2023 SESAH Conference in Little Rock, Arkansas, from September 27-30. Find information about past winners here.

Graduate Student Research Fellowship 

The Graduate Student Research Fellowship, established in 2018, assists one graduate student in architectural history or historic preservation in conducting research for their thesis or dissertation each year. The Fellowship awards $1,000 to offset research-related expenses and travel.

Applicants must be members of SESAH and must be enrolled in a graduate program in architectural history or historic preservation or a similar program at a college or university located in the SESAH member states. All applications will be considered, but preference will be given to applicants whose thesis or dissertation topic explores the architectural history of the South and SESAH’s 12 member states.

Recipients must submit a report on the use of the funds within one year of receiving the fellowship. They are also encouraged to present their research and project studies as part of the SESAH conference and to submit the results of their research for publication in Arris. Recipients should also acknowledge the fellowship in their completed thesis or dissertation.

All submissions should be sent via email to the chair of the Graduate Student Research Fellowship Committee: Philip Herrington, James Madison University, herrinpm@jmu.edu 

Deadline for applications: April 1, 2023. Find more information here. Fellowship recipients will receive notification of their award by May 4, 2023. Find more information on past fellowship recipients here.

2022-2023 Annual Campaign Update

We are excited to announce that the 2022-2023 SESAH Annual Campaign has raised $1,531. This is 30.6% of our $5,000 goal. We have received donations from Arkansas (2), Georgia (4), Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee (2), Texas (3), and Virginia. If you don’t see your state, you can change that. (We’re looking at you Alabama, Florida, and Kentucky.) Your generous donations will enable us to assist students and young professionals in the following ways: waiving or reducing registration fees at the 2023 Conference, awarding travel grants to the 2023 Conference, and awarding student fellowships. Additionally, you can make your donation in the honor of someone close to you. Donations have been made in honor of Gavin Townsend and John Schnorrenberg. All donations, big and small, have a significant impact on the education of young scholars.  Make an online donation now by clicking here. You can also mail a check. For more information, send an email to the treasurer.

Submit to Arris! 

Call for Papers: Articles and Field Notes

Arris, the journal of the Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians, is accepting submissions for articles and field notes to be published in upcoming issues.

Articles generally run from 5,000-7,000 words and are blind peer-reviewed. They should demonstrate a rigorous mastery over the scholarly literature, research methods, field work (if applicable), and available primary sources of the subject. Articles should proceed beyond a descriptive approach to draw new conclusions or present new theoretical paradigms.

Field notes are shorter contributions, approximately 2,500 words in length, and are blind peer-reviewed. These notes discuss significant ongoing field work or other research of interest to SESAH members.

Only original work neither published previously nor under review for publication elsewhere will be considered.

There is no specific deadline for submissions, which are accepted on a rolling basis. If an article or field notes is accepted, but the issue in progress already has a sufficient number of them, it will be published in the next issue.

Submissions should follow Arris guidelines.

Does your institution subscribe to Arris???

If not, encourage them to subscribe in one of 3 ways:

  1. Print subscription for $50 annually (1 issue) through UNC Press’s subscription fulfillment partners at Duke University Press. Contact:
    1. Email subscriptions@dukeupress.edu 
    2. Phone toll-free in the US and Canada (888) 651-0122 
    3. Phone (919) 688-5134 
  2. Digital subscriptions for $50 to Arris’s full catalog are available through ProjectMUSE. Arris is on their Hosted platform, so they will need to get a single title subscription through ProjectMUSE. 
  3. For both print and digital subscriptions for $60/year, reach out to Duke University Press at the contact info above.

Member News

The Courier, a publication of the Tennessee Historical Commission

The winter issue of The Courier, a publication of the Tennessee Historical Commission, has articles on the restoration of the state-owned Chester Inn in Jonesborough, conservation of a historic cemetery, National Register of Historic Places listings, and more. Find more information here.

Shaw Homestead Opening

The Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plain will open the Shaw Homestead in Pearl River County, Mississippi to visitors on Saturday April 22, 2023 from 10 am – 2 pm.  This free event gives visitors the opportunity to study a well intact late 19th century log dog-trot house and attendant outbuildings.  For more information on the open house please visit https://ltmcp.org/  

The recent National Register nomination of the Shaw Homestead can be viewed here.

News from Mississippi

At the 2023 Mississippi Historical Society Annual Meeting, SESAH Preservation Officer Jeff Rosenberg moderated a panel for the paper session “Environmental History in Mississippi.”

READ MORE ON OUR WEBSITE 

Jean Welz: the Assassination Continued
NEW RESEARCH UNCOVERED!The Assassination of Jean Welz, Part 2Zoom Panel PresentationSunday, March 5th, 1:00 PM PSTWelcome back author Peter Wyeth to the SAH/SCC Zoom platform as he shares new research he discovered after his last presentation in 2022.Have a conflict for Sunday? But a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!Photo: Maison Ziveli, courtesy of Peter Wyeth..Read moreConnect with u ‌ ‌ ‌SAHSCCBox 491952

NCCSAH Spring 2023 Maybeck Event

Date: February 20, 2023 at 2:44:00 PM PST>

We have a great NCCSAH event focusing on the architect Bernard Maybeck planned for Spring, 2023 (attached is a short description of the June 8, 2023 (Thursday) event). More details about this event will be included in the NCCSAH Spring, 2023 Newsletter.

Fall 2023 NCCSAH Tour

We are in the process of planning an incredible Fall, 2023 tour (October 17, 18 and 19) of San Diego that will include tours of Little Italy, the Gaslamp Quarter, Pedco Park, Balboa Park, the Central Campus of the University of California, San Diego, Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute, the La Jolla Cultural District (includes Irving Gill’s La Jolla Women’s Club and the Museum of Contemporary Art), the Old Town State Park and the Presidio Park.

LANDSCAPE HISTORY CHAPTERof the Society of Architectural HistoriansChapter News | FEBRUARY 2023
Image above is courtesy of Dumbarton Oaks, Trustees of Harvard University, wishing you a beautiful spring

Happy Winter/ Spring:
We hope this finds each of you well and staying warm and dry.  

As always, please send announcements, inquiries, and any other materials you want included in our newsletter- you can send to  wayt01@doaks.org.

If you are in DC, come visit at Dumbarton Oaks.
More soon and I hope to see you in Montreal in April.

Best, Thaisa et al…
Director | Garden & Landscape Studies | Dumbarton Oaks | Trustees for Harvard University
 Announcements: 
CALL FOR PAPERS TREE STORIES: TREES & THE MAKING AND UNMAKING OF PLACE
Co-organised by Christina Hourigan (Royal Holloway) and Caroline Cornish (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew) at the Royal Geographical Society Annual Conference, London
August 29 to September 1 2023. 
Abstract due March 23, 2023

‘Trees, woods and forests appear on the surface to be stable and unchanging features against which we can match our individual lives and the lives of nations and civilisations. But the history of trees is constantly being rewritten and the future of trees is uncertain.’This session seeks to showcase the wealth of geo-historical research around trees and their stories, and how trees have shaped and continue to shape place by their biological presence, their agency, and diverse human understandings of their values. Trees, woods, and forests are the subject of an expanding field of interdisciplinary research seeking to understand the relationships between people and the natural world from historical, cultural and geographical perspectives. …Stories of arboreal agency occur across cultures, collections, and climates; they are evident in imperial histories, and in the histories of science and exploration. The botanical networks created for the trade in live trees and in timber, and for the study of tree species during the period of empire extended globally but European/Western understandings have frequently existed in conflict with Indigenous cosmologies. And besides trade, Western understandings of trees as environmental assets are evident in accounts of afforestation, deforestation, and urban tree-scaping dating from the eighteenth century. This interdisciplinary session will juxtapose a range of approaches to tree histories, placing emphasis on the various methodologies employed to evaluate the contribution of trees to the making and unmaking of place, their cultural significance(s), and how their lives have become entangled in our own across time and space. If you are interested in presenting a paper at this session please send a 250-word abstract (with name, affiliation, and contact details) to Christina Hourigan (Christina.Hourigan.2020@live.rhul.ac.uk) and Caroline Cornish (C.Cornish@kew.org) by Friday, 17 March 2023. We will inform applicants of selected papers by Friday, 23 March 2023.  

“Communicating Architecture. From the  origins of modernity to the digital age”. 
https://www.granadacongresos.com/callforpapers
Deadline March 24th, 2023.The Architectural History Department at Universidad de Granada (Spain)  announces the call for contributions of the IV International Conference Cultura y Ciudad, which will take place in Granada from January 24 to 26, 2024. The theme for this edition is: “Communicating Architecture. From the origins of modernity to the digital age”.  Contributions are welcome from researchers affiliated to universities, research institutions, and independent researchers. At this stage, proponents are invited to send abstracts directly related to one of the four thematic blocks, written either in Spanish or English, with a maximum length of 500 words. All abstracts will be subjected to peer review. Authors of selected submissions will be contacted by the organizing committee and invited to submit a full conference paper. Full papers will be presented in person during the conference and included in the Proceedings volume. All registered participants will receive a printed copy of the Proceedings at the registration desk.
 137th Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association 
San Francisco, California
January 4–7, 2024
The deadline to submit a proposal for the AHA24 program is extended to March 6.  The AHA’s annual meeting is the largest yearly gathering of historians in the United States. All historians are welcome and encouraged to submit proposals for annual meeting sessions. The AHA also invites historically focused proposals from colleagues in related disciplines and from AHA affiliated societies. The Program Committee will consider all proposals that advance the study, teaching, and public presentation of history.The Association seeks submissions on the histories of all places, periods, people, and topics; on the uses of diverse sources and methods, including digital history; and on theory and the uses of history itself in a wide variety of venues. We invite proposals for sessions in a variety of formats and encourage lively interaction among presenters and with the audience. Please consult the Annual Meeting Guidelines and our Submission FAQs before submitting a proposal.
 CALL FOR PROPOSALSRace in Design History: An Anthology
edited by Kristina Wilson, Professor of Art History, Clark University and Michelle Joan Wilkinson, Curator of Architecture and Design, National Museum of African American History and CultureHow has race shaped the objects of our designed world? We invite contributors to submit to an edited volume that will focus on the ways design and design histories have engaged ideas about race, whether implicitly or explicitly. Race is a contested category with shifting meanings over time, and perceptions about race influence design history in multiple ways: how objects are designed; how designers imagine their ideal consumer; how designs are put into production and how those designs are marketed. Ultimately, race has an impact on the scope and structure of the residual design archive that historians are left sifting through. This edited volume welcomes contributions in the form of close readings of design objects as well as critical interrogations about design through the lenses of practice, pedagogy, curation, and historiography.Recent work in design history has emphasized the importance of decolonizing the predominantly Western and Northern biases of the modernist canon. This anthology aims to contribute to that work, and embraces the goals of critical race studies of design, with an investigation of the role of race in all aspects of design history. It welcomes scholarship that looks at under-valued objects of design, scholarship that expands our understanding of what it means to have a career as a designer, and scholarship that illuminates design history in new contexts. We seek narratives of design history that interrogate our assumptions about what is knowable in the past.We invite contributions on decorative objects, interiors, fashion, architecture, and graphic design, among others, 1800 to the present, global in scope. For further details click here. To submit a proposal, send a 300-word proposal to KrWilson@clarku.edu and WilkinsonM@si.edu with “Race in Design History” in the subject line by the deadline of March 15, 2023. Contributors will be notified by mid-April, and drafts will be due September 15, 2023.2023 HALS Challenge: Working Landscapes
For the 14th annual HALS Challenge competition, the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) invites you to document Working Landscapes. Historic “working” or “productive” landscapes may be agricultural or industrial and unique or traditional. Some topical working landscapes convey water for irrigation or provide flood control. Please focus your HALS report on the landscape as a whole and not on a building or structure alone. For this theme, the HAER History Guidelines may be helpful along with HALS History Guidelines.
 Deadline to submit short format histories: July 31, 2023
Awards presented: October 27-30, 2023, during the ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture in Minneapolis


SYMPOSIAASEH Annual Conference, March 22-26, 2023
Hilton Boston Back Bay, Boston, Massachusetts
Register for ASEH 2023Environmental Histories of the Black Atlantic World: Landscape Histories of the African Diaspora
Dumbarton Oaks Garden and Landscape Studies Symposium in partnership with the Mellon Initiative in Democracy and Landscape Studies, Washington, DC May 12 & 13, 2023. Registration will open in March 2023.
Symposiarchs: N. D. B. Connolly (Johns Hopkins University) and Oscar de la Torre (University of North Carolina at Charlotte)  For the last decades, scholars have interrogated the flow of goods, people, ideas, and forms of non-human life that constitute what we call the Atlantic World. Key to the field is the study of the “Black Atlantic,” an understanding of cultural and political connectedness that foregrounds the experiences of African-descended peoples, decenters Europe, and locates in place and time the multiplicity of Black cultures. Dumbarton Oaks recognizes the richness of the Black Atlantic as an idea and a place. Through a symposium on the landscape histories of the African diaspora, we aim to convene scholars, curators, and other cultural custodians conversant in Black Atlantic histories and committed to reshaping entire fields of study and practice from the Black experience outward.

Jobs and Opportunities

Cultural Heritage in the Forest Paid Summer Internship for HBCU Students
21 Feb – 02 Mar, 2023
https://www.achp.gov/CHIF

The U.S. Forest Service (FS) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) invite Historically Black College & University students interested in historic preservation or history-related fields to apply to the 2023 Cultural Heritage in the Forest (CHIF) summer program. Please share this opportunity with students and student groups at your HBCU. CHIF is a paid, four-week educational internship introducing students to the work done by the U.S. Forest Service Heritage program, to prepare them for future careers in cultural resources management and at the Forest Service. Participants will explore the work of historic preservation and the efforts of the two agencies to protect, restore, and interpret hundreds of thousands of historic sites. Participants also will connect with communities, stakeholders, professionals, and Indian tribes to learn about and engage in the stewardship of historic sites and public lands. If you are interested in pursuing careers in public lands, historic preservation, skilled preservation trades, history, archaeology, or anthropology, please register for one of two Zoom sessions to learn more and ask questions.  
 
Tuesday, February 21 at 3 p.m.
https://achp.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_W7cD9XefRUCjE5yY_lACmw 
Thursday, March 2 at 12 p.m. 
https://achp.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_nJEFVY00QKCgTe1hwLDQnw 
 
 

 NOTE:
IF YOU HAVE NOT YET VOTED TO APPROVE OR REJECT THE NOMNINATIONS FOR OFFICERS, PLEASE DO SO BY MARCH 1 by clicking here.

OFFICERS

President
Kathleen John-Alder
Rutgers University

Vice President
John Davis
Knowlton School, The Ohio State University

Secretary
Royce Earnest
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Newsletter Editor
Thaisa Way
Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Colleciton

Advisory Board
Finola O’Kane Crimmins
University College Dublin
(2019-2022)

Georges Farhat
University of Toronto
(2019-2022)

Mohammad Gharipour
University of Maryland
(2021-2024)

Margot Lystra
Independent Scholar
(2021-2024)

Stephen Whiteman
The Courtauld Institute of Art
(2021-2024)

Jan Woudstra
The University of Sheffield
(2021-2024)



Recent Books of Interest

SO WHAT HAVE YOU PUBLISHED LATELY- LET US KNOW

Allaback, Sarah. 2021. Marjorie Sewell Cautley, Landscape Architect For The Motor Age. S.L.]: Library Of Amer Landscape.

Dudley, Tara A. 2021. Building Antebellum New Orleans : Free People of Color and Their Influence. First edition. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Duempelmann, Sonja, ed/ 2022. Landscapes for Sport : Histories of Physical Exercise, Sport, and Health. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Ferrari, Carlyn Ena,. 2022. Do Not Separate Her from Her Garden : Anne Spencer’s Ecopoetics. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.

Gharipour, Mohammad. 2021. Health and Architecture : the History of Spaces of Healing and Care in the Pre-Modern Era. London ; New York: Bloomsbury Visual Arts.

Olin, Laurie. 2020. France Sketchbooks. First edition. San Francisco]: ORO Editions

Tchikine, Anatole, Francesco Ignazio Lazzari, Taylor Ellis Johnson, and Pierre de la Ruffinière Du Prey. 2021. Francesco Ignazio Lazzari’s Discrizione Della Villa Pliniana : Visions of Antiquity in the Landscape of Umbria. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Way, Thaisa. ed. 2022. Garden as Art: Beatrix Farrand at Dumbarton Oaks.Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

Whiteman, Stephen H. 2020. Where Dragon Veins Meet : the Kangxi Emperor and His Estate at Rehe. Seattle [Washington]: University of Washington Press.

Zeller, Thomas. 2022. Consuming Landscapes : What We See When We Drive and Why It Matters. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press.


 Have something to share in the newsletter? Click HereImage: Bomarzo, photo by Anatole Tchikine.
Contact us: sahlandscape@gmail.com.

Copyright ©The Landscape Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians

Subject: From Chicago Chapter of SAH: Free event from Unity Temple Restoration Foundation>



Unity Temple Restoration Foundation is hosting the second lecture in their Break::the::Box series. 

Steven Hubbard, Associate Principal, Solomon Cordwell Buenz, and Senior Designer on the Tribune Tower Residences will present “Chicago Tribune Tower – Chicago’s Crown Jewel”. 

Thursday, February 23 at 7pm. 

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Upcoming Events & Student Symposium Deadline ExtendedHi Amanda,Reminder: 2023 Directors’ Night / Annual MeetingMonday, February 27th at 7:00 pmPresented via Zoom; Pre-registration requiredA brief business meeting will precede the presentation of papers.Our upcoming Annual Meeting/Directors’ Night will feature presentations by past and present NESAH board directors. Please see the event page for more details and to register!Student Symposium Deadline ExtendedThe deadline to submit an abstract for the 2023 NESAH Student Symposium has been extended to February 20, 2023. Please see the Call for Papers on our website for more information.All the best,The NESAH BoardCall for Papers: HECAA@30 ConferenceThe Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture are delighted to announce that the Call for Papers for “HECAA@30: Environments, Materials, and Futures in the Eighteenth Century” is now available. Please visit the conference website: https://sites.google.com/umb.edu/hecaa30 for a list of open sessions and details. Applications for participation are due to session chairs by April 1, 2023.This in-person conference will take place in Boston, Cambridge, and Providence from October 12-14, 2023, with morning plenary sessions followed by gallery sessions, tours, and architectural site visits each afternoon. From HECAA:”On the land of the Massachusett and neighboring Wampanoag and Nipmuc peoples, Boston developed in the eighteenth century as a major colonized and colonizing site. Its status today as a cultural and intellectual hub is shaped by that context, making it a critical location to trace the cultural legacies of racism and social injustice between the eighteenth century and today. For whom is “eighteenth-century art and architecture” a useful category? What eighteenth-century materials, spaces, and images offer tools or concepts for shaping our collective futures? In considering these questions, we aim to expand HECAA’s traditional focus on Western European art and architecture and specifically encourage proposals from scholars working on Asia, Africa and the African diaspora, Indigenous cultures, and the Islamic world.We welcome proposals for contributions to panels, gallery sessions, roundtables, and workshops. Scholars at any career stage, and all geographic and material specializations, are encouraged to apply. We look forward to seeing you in Boston!”

FREE Recorded Presentation on the California Capitol Preservation Fight



FREE PROGRAM!The California Capitol:The Current Preservation Battle You Don’t Know About, But Should…Dick Cowan, Paula Pepper and former State Historic Preservation Officer Wayne Donaldson, share the fight for the California Capitol.SAH/SCC has made this important program FREE for all viewers. Watch, then share with other who care about preserving historic resources…Watch Now!Photo: Courtesy of Chris Lukather.Read moreConnect with u ‌ ‌ ‌
SAHSCCBox 491952Los Angeles, CA 90049

PAST PHILA CHAPTER SAH PROGRAM VIDEOS NOW ONLINE

Visit the Phila Chapter webpage for a selection of our past Zoom programs at
https://philachaptersah.org/index.php/videos/
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West Chester University Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology presents
BEYOND THE BELL: PHILADELPHIA’S GLOBAL HERITAGE
in the Old Library Building, 775 S Church Street, West Chester, PA 19383
Hours are Mondays, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.; Tuesdays, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.; and Thursdays, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Private appointments and special student-curator led tours can also be organized by calling (610) 436-2247 or emailing museum@wcupa.edu.

In partnership with the Global Philadelphia Association, this special exhibition celebrates the 50th anniversary of UNESCO’s World Heritage Convention by exploring the rich heritage of Philadelphia. Philadelphia’s Independence Hall and its famed Liberty Bell was one of the U.S.’ first World Heritage sites, deemed to be of universal human value for its importance in the creation of the world’s first Enlightenment-era Republic. However, the exhibition delves beyond this colonial narrative to show that Philadelphia’s global heritage is the result of continuous interactions of diverse communities over time.

With rare artifacts on loan from the National Parks Service, Lest We Forget Museum, Landis Valley Museum, Archdiocese of Philadelphia, among others; and original works by numerous Philadelphia-based artists such as Diane Keller, Ana Vizcarra Rankin, Salome Cosmique and Sue Chen, Beyond the Bell’s exhibits on labor, immigration, transportation, fashion and arts, festivals, sports and pop culture reveal the richness and global importance of the “City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love.”

Also on view is Earth Day at 50: Lessons for a Sustainable Future.

The museum is housed in the Old Library Building. Enter through the main front door on Church Street. Please note that there are stairs you will need to walk up to get to the building; unfortunately it’s a historic building (on the National Historic Register) and stairs are the only way to get into the building.

There is ample metered street parking in front of the building on Church Street. Note: this is a one-way street that leads to Rosedale Avenue. Parking meter payment is required on all days except Sundays through a municipal kiosk, which accepts credit cards. Free parking is available in Lot K located behind the Sykes Student Union, off Rosedale Avenue. On weekends you may park without a permit in any student-designated space.

If you are not able to join us for the tour, the entire exhibit is online. Use this link to enter the Interactive virtual exhibition
https://www.wcupa.edu/sciences-mathematics/anthropologySociology/museum/beyondTheBell.aspx
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Flagler Museum, West Palm Beach, Florida presents
THE ARCHITECTURE OF HORACE TRUMBAUER:
“THE STANDARD, METROPOLITAN AND AUTHORITATIVE THING”
Lecture by David B. Brownlee, University of Pennsylvania
Sunday, February 12, 3 PM
Register/view online at https://flaglermuseum.us/programs/lecture-series

Horace Trumbauer (1868–1938) was in many ways the most enigmatic architect of America’s “Gilded Age.” Although he left school when he was 16, by the time he was thirty he had built palatial homes for some of the nation’s wealthiest families, and his office would produce more than 800 designs over the next forty years. In addition to great houses, this included important public buildings such as the Widener Library at Harvard, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Free Library of Philadelphia, and the two campuses of Duke University. Trumbauer’s list of clients included many who wintered in Palm Beach, among them the Phippses, Stotesburys, and Wideners. And in 1925 he was commissioned to design the First Church of Christ, Scientist.

Like many successful architects of his day, Trumbauer worked in many styles: Tudor, Italian Renaissance, Palladian, English baroque, Georgian, and French neoclassical. His versatility and quiet competence led the author of a long, admiring review in Architectural Record in 1904 to call his work “the standard, metropolitan and authoritative thing.” But Trumbauer never discussed his work or explained his thinking, and his design methods and the precise authorship of the buildings created in his thirty-person office has been difficult to discover.

Recent research has begun to cast light on Trumbauer’s artistry and the complex collaborations that he orchestrated. Among the important aspects of this teamwork was the key role played by Julian Abele (1881–1950) the first African-American graduate of the architecture program at the University of Pennsylvania and the chief designer in Trumbauer’s office. Abele’s artistry was a vital ingredient in some of the firm’s most significant buildings, and despite racial prejudice and Jim Crow restrictions, his role was clearly visible and appreciated by many clients and fellow architects.
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Enjoy!
Mary Anne

NESAH 2023 Directors’ Night / Annual MeetingWhen: 27 Feb 2023 7:00 PM, EST
Where: ZoomEVENT DETAILS:2023 Directors’ Night / Annual MeetingMonday, February 27
7:00pmA brief business meeting will precede the presentation of papers.
Presented via Zoom; Pre-registration required.Dennis DeWitt
Brookline’s Mount Vernon Portico Houses
Three tall columned houses in Brookline’s Green Hill neighborhood, dating from 1794 to 1806, have been identified with the label “Jamaica Planter.”  Two are associated with well known later occupants — architect Henry Hobson Richardson and Boston Grand Dame, Isabella Stewart Gardner. Exploring the  genesis of “Jamaica Planter” revealed only a casually generated term that offered a convenient explanation for some unusual houses.  However, it did not comport with the first of these houses, Senator George Cabot’s “Old Green Hill.”  Its inspiration may have been George Washington’s Mount Vernon portico.Dennis De Witt holds Masters degrees in architecture from Harvard and the University of Pennsylvania. He is a Past-President of S.A.H./New England, a former Vice-Chair of the Brookline Preservation Commission, a Director and Past-President of Boston’s Metropolitan Waterworks Museum, and a Commissioner of the Massachusetts Historical Commission. He has been involved with historic preservation for over 50 years. His book-length publications include Modern Architecture in Europe: A Guide to Buildings Since the Industrial Revolution and various studies related to Boston’s 19th century water system, its architects and technology.Diana Martinez
The Olmsteds and the Imperial Prospect
In March of 1901 the U.S. Secretary of War wrote to the Olmsted firm requesting advice on improvements to Manila. Though Olmsted Jr. declined the job, he deeply influenced Daniel Burnham’s eventual plans. This paper will consider the legibility of U.S. Empire insofar as it is expressed in Olmsted’s work and influence.   Diana Martinez is an assistant professor of architectural history and the director of architectural studies at Tufts University. She is completing a book manuscript, Concrete Colonialism: Architecture, Infrastructure, Urbanism and the American Colonial Project in the Philippines.Robert Cowherd
Doing History in the Anthropocene
Teaching history to undergraduates as they inherit the multiple intertwined crises of the 21st century compels a critical reexamination of what we teach and how. Facing a torrent of information, how do they construct a dependable foundation for collective action? The challenge is to replace conventional teaching and learning mindsets to mobilize a more confident generation of history practitioners. Instead of studying history, college students can get a jump on a lifetime of doing history.Robert Cowherd, PhD, is a Professor at Wentworth Institute of Technology. His research and publications focus on the history and theory of architecture and urbanism in Southeast Asia and Latin America. He is the author most recently of “Batavian Apartheid: Mapping Bodies, Constructing Identities” in Southeast of Now and “Decolonizing Bamboo” in Dialectic IX. He is former President of the New England Society of Architectural Historians.
LAST CHANCE!Authors on Architecture: Alfred PreisZoom Panel PresentationSunday, February 5th, 1:00 PM PSTDon’t miss this special opportunity to learn about the work of this emigre Modern architect!.Have a conflict for Sunday? But a ticket and we will send you a link to the recorded program you can watch at your leisure…Read more…Purchase $5 ticket!

I just signed the petition “Landmark the Kogen-Miller Studios and the Glasner Studio!” and wanted to see if you could help by adding your name.

The goal is to reach 1,000 signatures and we need more support. You can read more and sign the petition here:

https://chng.it/dZkNzyHrBG